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tv   France Decides  BBC News  May 7, 2017 6:30pm-10:01pm BST

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hello and welcome to a special bbc news programme on the french election. we have a very exciting evening ahead of us. voters have gone to the polls and in just under half an hour's time we will get a rejection about who will become the next french president. voters are eliminated at the first hurdle the mainstream parties. over the course of the last two weeks they have been faced with two candidates who, let's faced with two candidates who, let's face it, have given them a diametrically opposed vision. let's start with emmanuel macron. he would
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be the youngest president since napoleon. he was voting in his hometown, rather nice seaside town. he wants to shake up french politics. he wants to bring together he says a coalition of the willing which he said would be able to reform france. and he wants an open facing france at the centre of a much more deeply integrated european union. he is the favourite but he is up union. he is the favourite but he is up againsta union. he is the favourite but he is up against a woman who needs very little introduction, marine le pen of the front national, the self—proclaimed champion of the forgotten. she was voting in the north where she has been a regional councillor. she has a very different vision. she would restore the borders of france. she would limit immigration, she would bring back the frank, she would give the french
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people a membership on their european union membership and she tells people at the rallies that she is the only defender of french workers and french factories against the unbridled globalisation that is offered by mr mac run. let's remind you of where the poles were on friday. this opinion poll by opinonway — carried out on friday — showed a clear lead for emanuel macron, giving him 62% compared to 38 percent for marine le pen. let me introduce you to two peephole, a friend of the bbc and visiting professor at havard university. and a representative of the polling agency who will
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hopefully tell us what the french people are thinking. looking at the polls, a lot of people think emmanuel macron will be president by the end of this evening. tell us a little bit about the initial projection, where does it come from and how confident can we be in that first one? those predictions are based on the ballot counting so in polling stations so we are interrogating so we are waiting for the closure of each polling station and we are counting the first 100 or 200 et seq. and then we extrapolate and we begin to have by the way, an indication of the results. but let's see. these are strategic polling stations around the country which you have used before. going back to
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2002, you have more or less got it right. these predictions are really accurate so no problems for us. tell us accurate so no problems for us. tell usa accurate so no problems for us. tell us a little bit about turnout today. it seems to be a bit lower than what we had in the first round and quite a bit lower than the second—round vote in 2012. this is a kind of a record because except in 1969, just after the departure of general de gaulle, this is a record because usually the turnout is higher for the second round. but you have probably followed the campaign between the two rounds, pretty tough campaign andi between the two rounds, pretty tough campaign and i think it explains also that many people did not want to choose between the two candidates. this is the result of the first round with around four
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candidates so it is difficult for them to go and vote for another one. what is at stake tonight, dominic? they are two candidates with very different visions of what france should become. i think what is at sta ke should become. i think what is at stake is not only the future of france, but to a large extent, the future of europe, and even broader, the image of democracy in the world. can democracies resist successfully the rise of populism? and if macron we re the rise of populism? and if macron were to be elected, that would give a message suddenly of optimism that would spread through the entire democratic world. from that standpoint, this is not a french election, this is an american type of election in the sense that the french for the first time are really choosing the path which the world,
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the democratic world is about to take. let mejust the democratic world is about to take. let me just show our viewers some maps from 2012 and 2017. this one from 2012 show is half the country is split between was what land and nicolas sarkozy. this is the 2017 map. we have a large collar of blue in the north—east going for marine le pen and in the line—up you have mr macron. i think we can look at map out swell. he took 33 districts from francois hollande and this is almost diametrically opposed from 2012. what is going on? you
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have a very divided france. it is in four parts and now there are only two candidates, so a lot of voters will decide they are not represented by the two that are remaining and either will decide to abstain or it is going to be probably an important factor in this round of elections, they have a vote blanc, they can write something which disqualifies their vote. they don't want to abstain but they do want to vote for any of the two candidates. that is particularly true if you look at the vote on the hard left, forjean—luc melenchon. how many will go out to vote today? 5096 of people intended to vote for macron, but only around
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let's say 20% for marine le pen and the rest, so 30% where hesitating. maybe more for abstention or more for a blank ballot paper. there was a hashtag doing the rounds which translated as without me on the 7th of may. millions of people of france do not see anyone to vote for in this second round. this is approved that there is a crisis of politics which is very serious in france —— this is the proof. the first task of the future president will be to try and reconcile french people with politics. i will not say reconcile with politics because french people are really, really passionate about politics and we saw that during those weeks, but it is true that the
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populism and populist candidates and the most traditional ones, that is also why emmanuel macron has emerged so also why emmanuel macron has emerged so easily. there are those cracks in out so easily. there are those cracks in our society. but once again, they are passionate. they want to believe, they still want to believe in politics because the turnout is really high anyway. they want a candidate in front of them who can give them this hope. candidate in front of them who can give them this hopelj candidate in front of them who can give them this hope. i should just explain the setting behind us. it is beautiful. if you are wondering what the flag is, that is to mark the 8th of may anniversary, the victory day for france at the end of the second world war. some of the steps underneath will be for the
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celebration in a few days' time. whoever does become president will be inaugurated on a week on sunday. at the latest. and the two presidents, the one who is elected tonight and the former president will be there tomorrow morning to celebrate together the victory over 110w celebrate together the victory over now to germany in 19115. celebrate together the victory over now to germany in 1945. 0k. let's bring in damian grammaticus who is in place at the macron ho. i would think given the polling - saw on think given the polling they saw on friday they would be in a buoyant mood. they are. this is the macron rally event which is planned if he emerges the winner. inaudible we are expecting possibly in a couple of hours' time, mr macron
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will come here, but right now, you have to say, are they excited? there are crowds of people, young supporters, who have all been given french national flags. i supporters, who have all been given french nationalflags. i have to say thatis french nationalflags. i have to say that is a very multicultural mix... damian, i'm sorry to interrupt, we are having some problems with your line. we will come back to you. as damian was saying, in case you could not hear him, the celebrations this evening will be at the louvre in the centre of paris. people are starting to turn up. lots of people carrying the french flag. there will be one rally there and one rally in the east of the city. we will go to marine le pen's camp as an when she shows up there. probably sometime in the next half an hour. let's go to
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bordeaux to speak to new low mcgovern. she has been watching people voting down there. it is the seat of alan juppe, people voting down there. it is the seat of alanjuppe, he is the mayor. —— nuala mcgovern. our people excited to be going out and voting in the second round. i think they we re in the second round. i think they were in the morning. there were a few stragglers to my left who were p°ppin9 few stragglers to my left who were popping in to cast their ballots. i was in the polling station a few minutes ago. i am in the town hall of this beautiful city right now. two polling stations inside. some people were coming in and saying so sorry i am late. but they were getting in their ballot. turnout is no. it is a good few percentage points down. you mentioned alan juppe points down. you mentioned alan juppe the mayor. this is his town hall. he was behind me a few minutes ago as we were watching damien in paris. he has gone into one of the
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corners here. he has gone to give a speech at the town hall at about nine o'clock local time. his podium is ready and there is a grand chandelier over it. as he made his way through the courtyard he shook pounds with the police officers who are providing security which has become a feature at these polling stations —— he shook hands. i think the mood here is slightly different. perhaps people who are coming up taking their time voting, perhaps more reluctant than the people who we re more reluctant than the people who were in at the very first thing. there will be sensibly that there is only a few minutes to go. as we have seenin only a few minutes to go. as we have seen in the round, projections come very quickly. french media is also beginning to stream into the town hall. and the macron headquarters are not farfrom hall. and the macron headquarters are not far from here where hall. and the macron headquarters are not farfrom here where people will be heading to and also the offices of the front national are
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having a party in bordeaux. there is a very wealthy city near —— this is a very wealthy city near —— this is a wealthy city and it is perhaps insulated from much of france but there are still divisions when it comes to the candidate and perhaps a lot of resentment which has erupted throughout this campaign and trying to decide which way france should 90, to decide which way france should go, really from monday morning. to decide which way france should go, really from monday morninglj should tell people that the polling stations in the towns have closed but in the bigger cities they will stay open until eight o'clock. that is an hour later than 2012. because of the state of emergency security has been very tight? it has. i mentioned the police officers here.
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if you go outside the gates sometimes you will see the military armed guards who are walking through. it is kind of at odds because you have these beautiful big squares, small children on their scooters with their parents, perhaps dropping in to vote but flanked by these military patrols which i suppose have become part of french life. i have talked about terrorism and security to some of the voters here. it is not as high on the agenda as economy and jobs are and also the fact of the eu which these candidates have very different opinions on but it will also be a deciding factor. it will be interesting to see how it breaks down in this region and we know it will not be the socialist or the republicans who will be holding the seat. it will be en marche! or front national. we will find out not too long. another half hour until we get
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some projections. very much so. all the grandees have gone by the wayside. sarkozy, alan juppe, francois fill in and through the middle has ridden macron and marine le pen. we will be live at the macron and le pen headquarters as france waits for those first results to come in. i had beenjoined by two more people who know something about france. hugh schofield is our paris correspondent and also we have a civil rights campaigner. tonight's result will have a direct impact on the future direction of the european union ahead. this report on the
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day's voting from hugh who has been out and about in paris. you join me at a table in a school. people come to pick up their cards and they go to cast their ballots behind the curtain over here. a classic snapshot of a presidential election in france but in some way of the moment is different. one is that in emmanuel macron and marine le pen we have two leaders who are outside the existing political structures. we have seen a succession of establishment figures alljust succession of establishment figures all just discarded succession of establishment figures alljust discarded as if the only political offering that has any meaning for people is one that is entirely new. the other point is in macron and le pen we have two people
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who claim to transcend the old left right political divide. they both claim to drawing supporters from either end of the old political spectrum. in the new political grid, if you like, they represent very divergence ends. the pen for the revival of the nation, for borders and protection and macron saying no, france have to engage in globalisation and it has to reform to do that better. in this divide between the two candidates, we see a fundamental argument about politics, modern politics, which has reso na nces modern politics, which has resonances well beyond the borders of france. some of the thoughts from hugh schofield who has been out and about
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in paris today. let's show you some of the pictures of the macron rally which is starting to build up in the louvre gardens this evening. lots of people. you can see the tricolore in full display. that is the glass pyramid. a lot of thought has gone into where mr macron should be this evening. there are lots of locations where he could have met his supporters. every election there is a debate about where it should be. last time it was in the left wing territory. with jacques chirac it was right wing territory. macron likes to call himself neither one nor the other, he has gone somewhere where he thinks is neutral, the area in front of the louvre has no association is one way or the other. you could say it has royalist connections! but for some reason or
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another it is not deemed to have any associations one way or the other, at least, that is the way he is spinning it. if he had gone to the bastille or the east of the city would be seen as the left wing territory and broadly, it is in line with his new moderate centre. says scenes of celebration is down there at the louvre. how many people do you think in the suburbs, how much will they be celebrating this evening, given that if the polls are right, marine le pen has been defeated? the whole country is not very fond of this election. it began with hysteria and corruption cases. people were told it was a matter of fact. 60% of
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people voted from macron because they had no other choice. the country is deeply divided along racial lines. the difference will not be as big as in 2002 when we had 82% forjacques chirac. the losers of globalisation is, of the working class will be decimated by this programme. emmanuel macron wants to run the country like a start—up company. the problem is we have seen what that economy does with people being held hostages because they pay all the social taxes and the emperor gets away with the profits. this is a problem for a lot of voters in france, mr macron, as marine le pen has tried to paint him, is very much seen as the continuity candidate,
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hugh? you have the extreme right and extreme financiers, the phrase they have cooked up to paint someone in the colours of someone who is in the wilderfringes of the colours of someone who is in the wilder fringes of political life and therefore dangerous. we do have 50% of the population who voted for marine le pen orjean—luc melenchon on the far left and the other fringe candidates so you have over half the country who would not agree with his broadly liberal views. his argument would be that is precisely what france needs. it is because of the failure to enact gradual reform of any kind that we have the blockage and the fight to the extremes. i guess he was correct, that is not how it is perceived by many, many people. the great challenge of the next five years is to see if he can unblock things. he is a magician with words, can he be a magician with words, can he be a magician with actuality and get the changes which he says are too long in
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coming, which should not be too hard if only people of goodwill came together in the middle. he is a remarkable man and they may be can bring it. for our viewers who are just joining bring it. for our viewers who are justjoining us we are about seven minutes away from our first projection. we will get a sense of which way this presidential election has gone, whether it is macron or marine le pen who has been chosen to lead france for the next five years. what we do know is a revolution in french politics is underway. neither candidate represents one of the country's traditional of government. they got knocked out two weeks ago. karen giannone has been out and about. in this final round of france's presidential election, voters only have two candidates left to choose from. but under french electoral law they also have three other options.
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first of all there is abstention. the french can choose not to vote, either out of principle or apathy and this can affect turnout which is traditionally very high in france. in the last round it was 77.8%. in ten to 12 it was over 80%. some think this time around would be the lowest turnout ever. voters do have two other choices. one is vote nul, to simply spoil the ballot paper. but for the first time there is another choice. the third option is the vote blanc, the black vote. that means you wanted to take part in the election but you rejected all the candidates on offer. you can do that by dropping an empty envelope or blank ballot paper into the box.
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under new rules introduced last year, these votes are counted. while neither candidate can claim them, we will see the figures show up at the end of all this. as he was telling us, there will be plenty of people in france who will be voting for emmanuel macron but they do not thoroughly agree with they do not thoroughly agree with the policies he puts forward. one poll said 60% of people will vote for him without fully agreeing with his programme. he is the anything but candidate, anything to keep up marine le pen and the front national. our other guests are back with us. either candidate will have a huge challenge bringing the very divided country back together and of course, we are looking with one eye at the parliamentary elections in june. does it necessarily follow that whoever wins tonight will be able to win a majority in the
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country? no, it does not. it traditionally occurs which means the french tends to be the just lists. they want to give a majority to the man they have elected as their president. but this year, it is really so you may not derive from the past lessons for the future. no, he does not have a majority to govern tonight. he will have to concur it if he is elected. he has no politicians in the party so he has to win at least 289 mps around the country out of 577, and people will know whatever country they are in watching around the world, that old parties are deeply embedded in society is, in different towns insists —— and districts it is not easy. it is not easy but we do not know the influence on the ground of
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this movement, en marche!. this is a real challenge for him. this is the third round of the election. he maybe not in an position to confirm. it could be him, it could be marine le pen, but for both of them they may not be in a position to govern. the larger, the majority of the winner, the easier to get a majority because you have a bigger legitimacy. you can they look, this is the difference between me and my adverse three being elected significantly or not triumphantly. you have to give me a majority. the big parties will be licking their wounds, particularly the republicans who feel cheated in this election. they feel this was their election to win and they will not roll over willingly. i think this will be
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difficult for the republicans because this will be about their unity as well. we have already heard about rallies for macron and on the left, there would probably be a tension between melenchon's voters and he could legitimately pretend to be the head of the left and the socialist parties. some of them could be prompted to have a deal with emmanuel macron. i think in the two following weeks will be decisive for everyone. just very quickly? it is premature to declare the death of the right and the left in france, but it is probably right to say the socialist party, as it exists is now that. yes, the socialist party
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taking just 6% of the vote, a lamentable 6%. we understand the socialists will be making a statement 15 minutes after the first projection comes out. on the right, francois fillon stood aside last week. we understand mr barr on is telling his mps that they should not fraternise with the party of mr macron. you are watching a bbc news french election special. it is coming up to eight o'clock here in paris. the polls have closed around the country. 66,000 polling stations around the country are closing. the bbc can now give you the early projections that show that emmanuel macron will be the next president of france. this is the polling projection that we have, 65.5% for emmanuel macron. this is from the
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polling agency with us tonight. and 34.5% for marine le pen. you can hear plenty of people sounding their horns, very pleased with those rip ports. it is pretty much in line with the polling we have had throughout the last two weeks. a bit higher than of late. but the debate has played a crucial role. i think it was clear also that she probably gets there would be a slight demotivation against her voters and probably also less people coming from the other candidates towards her, and i think this would be the contrary for macron. the
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trick will being flown, these are the young macron supporters, it is quite extraordinary wireless piety has come from. truly unprecedented. it isn't even a party. no, it is a movement. a political fairy tale, there is no other word to describe it. someone who was unknown to years ago that they could be elected tonight with 65.5% of the vote, which is a very significant victory, which is a very significant victory, which gives him a lot of legitimacy. is not really an asset in politics. 39 years of age. i understand he is the youngest president who will be elected in the top four western democracies. the youngest in france since 1848, louis bonaparte!m
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democracies. the youngest in france since 1848, louis bonaparte! it is very different. he comes not from a great political family, not even from paris, but from the provinces. plus i think also political men is that position in not the right or the left, and this is also something. let's go to the louvre. they quite like that, damian. inaudible hundreds of them... as your guests which are saying...
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when we can make contact with him properly we will bring you something. i think you can get a feeling of what it is like that. we understand mr macron is going to give a more sober speech at his headquarters in the course of the next half hour before he goes down to the stage at the louvre to speak to his supporters. but we were just talking a bit about the background. when you look back to this time last year you would have put a fairly big bets on nicolas sarkozy and marine le pen perhaps in the second round, at least somebody from the republican party. of course nicolas
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sarkozy was immolated in the primaries. i would've said the logical favourite was alain. the oldest, the wisest and of course he did not make it in the primaries. and of course francois fillon had this familyjobs and of course francois fillon had this family jobs corruption and of course francois fillon had this familyjobs corruption scandal hanging over him. a lot of people we re very hanging over him. a lot of people were very bitty about what happened in the republican party. we will hear from in the republican party. we will hearfrom some of in the republican party. we will hear from some of them tonight. the political winds of fortune have been blowing all the way for emmanuel macron. what do you mean? he has been very lucky throughout. he has come right through the middle, largely because of the corruption investigation... but also because during both primaries this is the most left and the most left—wing and the most right—wing candidates that have been chosen, and that also left
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a big space for the centre. that is why once again this is probably the right guy at the right place at the right guy at the right place at the right moment. there was an alignment of planets, so to speak, that is unique, but exceptional circumstances sometimes give rise to exceptional people. and he probably places himself in a very limited category. there are very few names that come to mind. clearly, de gaulle comes to mind. bonaparte comes to mind. is he that exceptional? he went to an ivy league university here in paris, then the classical training ground for french politicians. rothschild bank, economy minister, and in a short space of time... he must be a very intelligent mind. he is truly exceptional. to be a high technocrat
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is easy and from that standpoint his political views and political background... here's something more, something more mysterious. he has an empathy of a political kind which you would find very rarely. i think in america bill clinton had that kind of empathy with others. there isa kind of empathy with others. there is a huge cacophony of sound around the champs—elysees. people beeping their horns. more so than usual, this evening. let's go back to the louvre and see if we can hear damian. we had some problems with communications, but hopefully we can hear you now. we have had some problems but that is because there are so many people here who have now streams in and the sound system they we re streams in and the sound system they were making so much noise. the
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excitement here has been, since that initial prediction came up on the big screens, 65 pop .5% for emmanuel macron, the crowd are delighted. thereafter hundreds and hundreds of them, young macron supporters, very young, have all streamed in, we are at the bottom end of the champs—elysees. they have all been coming in in the last couple of hours carrying their flags. they are coming here because they are expecting mr macron to come and talk to them in an hour and a half or so, and they of course were delighted because that result, 65%, if that is borne out in the final results, that surpasses anybody‘s expectations. there was an expectation, if he did well, according to the projections, he might get around 60%. but voters today we were talking to were very nervous about the outcome. here that
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65% sent them into ecstasies. damian, when he comes down of course a lot of people will be focusing on the woman standing next to him, the woman who is 24 years his senior. very influential in his life and he has already said he will give her a prominent role, perhaps as the real first lady of france. yes. this has been one of the things that people have been very interested in. his wife. he met her when he was a student, she was a drama teacher, 20 yea rs student, she was a drama teacher, 20 years his senior, already married to someone else. he declared to her that he would want to marry her and he went through with that. that was against the wishes of both their families. they won them round. she married him and they have been together ever since. that has been a
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story he has drawn on in this presidential campaign to say that determination he showed them he would show again when he was seeking the presidency here. it has become pa rt the presidency here. it has become part of his story. it will be a very interesting change for france if he does follow through and give his wife that first lady role, that will be something new and different that he will bring along with many of the other changes he proposes. thank you. that is the picture down at the louvre. we will cross shortly to where the camp of marine le pen r. she is due to appear in front of them in the next half hour. let's talk a bit about marine le pen. 35% is probably just below talk a bit about marine le pen. 35% is probablyjust below where she wa nted is probablyjust below where she wanted to be. i think they wanted 40%. how will the/ al reacts, and is
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her position as leader secure?” think it is very disappointing for them. she was hoping for 40%. the end of the campaign was disastrous for them. the debate on wednesday, eve ryo ne for them. the debate on wednesday, everyone agrees was something that was a lot of voters off her, and what could have been a really significant vote at 40%, collapsed in the last few days to 35%. that said, she still has put on a lot of votes, she is above the 10 million votes, she is above the 10 million vote mark which is the first time that has happened for the front national al. is there an alternative? i know there is not a happy party, the front nationale. there are people who think the party should take other roads. we know her niece is very popular among a certain type of front nationale
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voter. but i think what we have to say what she has done is remarkable and the end of the campaign showed the limits of the party's repositioning, they remain a party of protest, they came right to the brink of being a serious party and ruined it in the debate where she could do nothing but sound. she is speaking now. she is about to address her supporters. translation: hello citizens. overseas, in france and abroad. the french people have chosen a new president for the republic and they voted for continuity. i call mr macron to be congratulated on being elected and i believe in the main interest of the country and therefore i wish success to him in
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therefore i wish success to him in the face of the challenges that will face france, and i want to thank the 11 million french people who gave me their vote, 11 million french people who gave me theirvote, and 11 million french people who gave me their vote, and also the militants who supported me and were walking along by my side throughout the campaign. andl along by my side throughout the campaign. and i thank all the people who supported me in their very brave and courageous choice. through that massive and historical choice the french chose the patriot and republican alliance as the main opposition to the project of that new president. the political parties that have chosen to vote for macron are no longer legitimate to represent an alternative force or even a credible position. the first round showed that there was total decomposition of normal political french life and the second round is a recomposition rounds that division
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between patriots and globalists. it is that's choice that is going to be presented to the french during the legislative elections. i will be at the head of that battle to try to have a wider number of people to choose france, protect its independence, its freedom, is identity, its safety, its social model, something that concerns asked in the face of the perspective of this new five—year is. the front national is committed in alliance strategy to renew itself to be worthy of that historic situation. in the second round. therefore i suggest we reorganise a art movement to set up a new political force what a lot of french people are asking for and what is all the more
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necessary for the reconstitution of the country. and all people were interested in the motherland, they mustjoin us to be involved with us, because now more than ever france will need you. long live the republic and long live france! applause so there is marine le pen addressing her supporters. she has phoned emmanuel macron in the last few minutes to congratulate him. the french people, she said, have chosen the continuity candidate. she has made the point that he is a continuation of the policies of francois ilott. 11 million people voted for her. i want to put that in context. 4.8 million voted for jean—marie le pen in 2002. looking at some of the reaction this evening, the person currently in
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charge says she has run a good campaign and it was a good result for the front national. apparently the uk prime minister has warmly congratulated president elect macron on his success. we are also hearing the german chancellor has tweeted in congratulation to emmanuel macron. the former partner of france were along and says mr macron's victory signals change in a political generation and signals some hope. let's bring some guests back in. we have sophie who was campaigning for jean—luc melenchon on the hard left? just left. do you get a feeling for
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how they voted today? think the figures you said earlier are clearly showing that marine le pen is not gaining a lot from the first turn to the second term, she is gaining 12 points, which means it is mostly francois fillon's voters who drifted towards her, whereas the extension and the blank vote is very high will stop i think it has not been so high since 1969 or something like that. that could be a sign of our voters because i think a lot of people have voted for macron to kick out marine le pen but a big part of our population is a bit apathetic towards macron's programmes. that is a signal. there is a political message there that will mean that the first day of mr macron, the
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first day of his ability to govern, there will be challenges and we have parliamentary elections. in that election, the duty for our candidate will be to bring some of the challenges that were completely absent from this campaign. for example, environmental issues. not a single word in the final debate on wednesday. it is the biggest threat on this planet, not a single word. when you put your supporters, the 7 million people who voted for jean—luc melenchon with those who voted for marine le pen and the fringe candidates, nearly 50% of people have voted for a eurosceptic candidates. there is a lot of celebration in brussels tonight that mr macron has won but that is also tinged with the reality that a good many people here in france have serious reservations about the european union project. it is a
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factor. since 2005 when people voted against the constitutional treaty, and that boat in 2005, it was also put forward, supported by a big share of the left parties, including jean—luc melenchon at the time. so being eurosceptic, i understand this expression and especially i see it in british newspapers, but it does not have the same... who is a eurosceptic? someone who has critical regard to what is happening in europe? i think this is pretty healthy considering what is happening. iam healthy considering what is happening. i am afraid on the other hand that macron will absolutely change nothing in europe. if anything, make things worse actually. for example, the first meeting with mrs merkel, what will he say to her? i'm afraid he will be a new lap dog of this is merkel.
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very quickly, how many seats to expect to win in the upcoming elections and would your party work with annual macron on some of his economic programmes? it is not a lottery so i am not going to give you figures, it is clearly too soon to say, but we will be in all 577 constituencies for sure, and no, we will not be able to, especially not on the economy programme, because as you have seen, one of the first announcement of mr macron was to defend a new labour reform, done by decree. so not asking the parliament position and vote and debate and pushit position and vote and debate and push it through, which was the one of the very reasons why a manual valves was rejected. sophie, thank you. let's go to the marine le pen camp. james reynolds is there for us. so marine le pen conceding early
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this evening on those projections. they are overwhelmingly in favour of emmanuel macron. what will the front national make of that result? they will have to look at it in the long term. they will have to measure their own progress election by—election, decade by decade. they started in 1974 with 0.74% of the vote. i think this will be complied with 2002. it looks like marine le pen has by and large double her father's vote in 2002. this will be a source of optimism but i think there will be disappointment that they did not reach 40% of the vote. i don't think they can say they are one step away from winning the next election, there is clearly a lot more work to be done to persuade other parts of france that this party is electable. and of course they will go one, they will go on to they will go one, they will go on to the parliamentary elections in january, in fairly healthy form.
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they will want to take a number of seats in the parliament. yes, and they start from a meagre base. they have two mps out of 577 in the national assembly. in some ways, the only way for them is up, but it does give a sense of the amount of work that marine le pen has to do in order to make sure that her party becomes the opposition force she wa nts becomes the opposition force she wants it to become. you cannot say you are the main opposition party if you are the main opposition party if you have only got two mps. yes, just looking at some of the other polls as we talk to, we have another one, pretty similar to the one we have been showing you from kantar public, 61% for macron and 34 for marine le pen. there is another one which has mr macron on 65.9% and slip n on 34.9%. they are all pretty much of a
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muchness. they have mr macron ahead. when you compare the 11 million votes that the front national got in this round with the 4.8 her father got back in 2002, it does show how the party is performing over the long—term? the party is performing over the long-term? that is their point. they area long-term? that is their point. they are a movement which measures their progress in decades, not single elections. they got up to 18% in 2002, now they are up to the mid—30s. it is not as much as they would have wanted this time around, but they would say look at the long—term trajectory. look at how they are increasing their vote. they would also be pleased by the amount of legitimacy they have had. for yea rs of legitimacy they have had. for years theirs was a fringe movement. a lot of parts of france boycotted
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them, ignored them. with nearly 35% of the vote now they will say they can no longer be ignored. the question is whether marine le pen can turn to her own supporters and say we are one stop away from winning the next election. it is ha rd winning the next election. it is hard that someone who got 34% of the vote can say that. thank you. dominique moisi, i was talking about the long game for the front national. are you in disagreement with that? it may be the peak of their political life. it all depends on what happens in the next five years. if there are results, if unemployment comes down, they will do less in five years from now. it is the responsibility of emmanuel macron. from that standpoint, it gives us an understanding of what happened tonight. hope prevailed over anger, with a little bit of help of fear. a lot of people voted
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for macron because they were scared, they got scared at the very end of marine le pen revealing the old nature of her party in the debate. but she has, some would say, detoxified the brand somewhat. she has got rid of some of the anti—semitism and the nasty elements of the party, some would say they are still there but it has become an electable force. if you look at what happened in 2002, the left grabbed its nose and voted forjacques chirac even though they'd not like him, this time not so many people felt inclined to vote against her? that is true but the situation has greatly changed. i am not sure the dna of the national front has changed. in fact, in the debate, she was her father. there was a brutality, a roster city that destroyed all the efforts she made during the last five years to appear
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more acceptable. the same could be true ofjean—luc melenchon, maybe this is the high point for him? he is getting on. he performed brilliantly in the election, he took 7 million votes, but what happens to the movement over the next five yea rs ? the movement over the next five years? there is a big difference also with marine le pen. we will enter the national assembly for the first time in reality, so we will be for the first time, in a position to d raft new laws for the first time, in a position to draft new laws and so on. of course, jean—luc melenchon is not an eternal man, his time will come, but we have the new generation ready as you might have seen in the figures. we are the third political party in terms of use and support. the new generation is there and the future stands with us. it is a factual stance. and what he was saying, for
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the front nationale, it is in their dna to be fascist. you have someone like the general secretary who said the gas chamber was like some kind of detail in history, not really sure it existed or something like that. it is proof that behind there, it exists. now all the eternal divisions that marine le pen was able to federate all these people, especially to support him. now all the internal divisions will surface. it will not suffice for mr macron to be more of the same. she got well over 10,000 villages and town halls who voted for the far right, who voted for something different. who voted for the far right, who voted for something differentm means there is a level of despair and anger that is there, that has
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been expressed in the election, and the problem for emmanuel macron, as the problem for emmanuel macron, as the new president, is to answer, to find answers to that anger and that despair. that is pretty much about jobs, 5 million people without a job, one in four people under the age of 25 without a full—time job, it is about getting people into employment? it starts with jobs but it goes much deeper. it requires consideration, a sense of eternity, meaning that the state takes care of these people, realises they exist. they are not in a kind of bubble above them and far from them.” agree with you on this point. the only disagreement we have is i don't think mr macron represents that changing reality. he was going to apply the old same recipe and the
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deregulation programme, the agenda he has in terms of the economy and labour reform will be very violent to people. i think it isjust labour reform will be very violent to people. i think it is just a matter of weeks really to see huge mobilisation, ok, his first few reforms will be good pr, he is a lwa ys reforms will be good pr, he is always doing a good communication campaign, he will change slightly his government, the government with new faces, a lot of new faces, a lot of women and so on, and then we will start the big business. when he was the economy minister he brought in something which would liberate certain sectors of the french economy and people came out in their thousands to block it and he was forced to water it down, what will be different when he brings out his liberalising agenda in the months ahead? he is the president now. he has been elected with a sizeable majority. he has been carried to power with a sense of elation and
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hope for many, fear and despair for others. this is where we disagree fundamentally. i think it can succeed and i hope deeply for my country without any ideological vision that he will succeed, that it is not a matter of principle or whatever, he can do it. because other countries in europe have done it. is it about him doing it, or is it. is it about him doing it, or is it about the french accept in change? spending, for instance, government spending has risen over the last ten years from 51 to 57%. the public sector is bloated. the sort of reforms he is putting forward were a pale imitation of the reforms francois fillon was putting forward ? coming from a german version, it is understandable for them, but when you are talking about public
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services we have a massive regeneration of our country, we need more employment, more public input, more employment, more public input, morejobs in more employment, more public input, more jobs in public more employment, more public input, morejobs in public services, more schools, more hospitals... more spending will bring more... you are the highest spenders in the world! it will bring more revenue in the end. what macron was to do is what mr ronald has been doing. we have more unemployment. 9 million poor people in this country. the same goes for germany. why do you have anti—european movements so high now? there is a recipe that does not work. just to reply to you on one point, the extreme right in germany
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is decreasing significantly. there is decreasing significantly. there isa is decreasing significantly. there is a macron maniac impact as their is a macron maniac impact as their is one in italy with the rebirth of matteo darmian say. so from that stamp pointi matteo darmian say. so from that stamp point i think he is the right middle ground. frost while fillon was too extreme, to brutal in his approach. but what he was to do he can do by doing it moderately. we will come back to this. the great pretender in italy did not get onto well. emmanuel macron, the 39—year—old from the centre—left, projected to get 65.5% of the vote, in comparison to 34.5% for the far right candidate marine le pen. these we re right candidate marine le pen. these were compiled by the kantar polling company. they are samples of actual votes as the public cast their
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ballots earlier today. a short time ago, the front national mall leader conceded defeat. she made a short phone call to macron and said this time the french people had chosen continuity. translation: the french people have chosen a new president for the republican big voted for continuity. i phoned him to congratulate him on being elected and i believe in the main interest of the country and therefore i wished success to him in therefore i wished success to him in the face of the challenges that face france and i want to thank the 11 million french people that gave me their vote. through that massive and historical choice the french chose the patriot and republican alliance as the main opposition to the project of that new president. the political parties that have chosen to vote for macron are no longer legitimate to represent an
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alternative force or even a credible opposition. the first round showed that there was total decomposition of normal political french life and the second round is a recomposition round, that division between patriots and globalists. a fairly downbeat mood then at the le pen camp this evening. let's quickly show you the pictures down at toulouse, where they are gearing up for a big party this evening. —— at the louvre. this is where macron will address the public later. you can see there are bands on the stage warming up the crowd. i don't think they will need much warming up. you can see the french flag flying high and people driving around the arctic tree on the hind asks sounding their horns. lots of people in paris very
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excited. only 5% of people in paris voted for marine le pen in the first round. let's find out what the mood is like in bordeaux, where alan should pay is the mouth. what has been the reaction there? there were people standing in here cheering as that result came in on the television of projections for macron to be the next president of france. with me i have deputy head of the macron campaign called en marche! . could you have dreams of this when you're could you have dreams of this when you're ago? one year ago when the movement started, i would never have dreams that that kind of trajectory, which was very good, it was a dream, yeah. what about the figures. we are looking at approximately 65% to perhaps 34 plus and. are you happy
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with that? i am very happy with it. we we re very with that? i am very happy with it. we were very worried with the angry feelings of some french who wanted not to vote at all. so we are very glad that emmanuel macron is elected with a big figure of 65%. glad that emmanuel macron is elected with a big figure of 6596. it is a good school. but still the 34%, that is the strongest showing there has been for the front national. there are so many people that don't want emmanuel macron to be the leader or don't agree with his policies, how can he overcome that? we are conscious that lots of people haven't voted for emmanuel macron. others voted for him but are not very convinced by the platform. so the first big challenge he will have
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two face is to reconciliation french society. bordeaux is when the town, it is not suffering from some of the issues other pounds of france are, what you think his biggest challenge is for this region? i think it is quite the same in the country. on one side you have the countryside and the other you have big cities. people from the countryside often feel excluded from the progress and the dynamics of economic 's, and thenl the dynamics of economic 's, and then i guess the big challenge will be to reconciliation is everybody and make a big force for france to be united from the countryside and the big cities for people to feel together, and feel french and feel together. a year ago people might have expected the mail of this city to be perhaps the next president. we
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are here in his town hall, he is going to give a speech, but we are looking at somebody who has never been elected before. 39 years of age. are you concerned about his inexperience? i feel his age is a good thing for france and one thing the election this campaign has shown is people want change. they want change and they don't want any more traditional parties, and for me the young mess of emmanuel macron is a good thing and shows that we can progress towards a new way. some would say change brings a lot of risks. and it can be dangerous. at such a particular time for france, a state of emergency since 2015, unemployment at 10%, does that seem
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to match the one person to be able to match the one person to be able to conquer? it is notjust one person. they are a big team with him. i guess that the platform of emmanuel macron is well— balanced him. i guess that the platform of emmanuel macron is well—balanced and it is not very risky. he has a big, great platform for unemployment, against unemployment, he has big projects also for the economy and so i guess it is not very risky. we have everything to win with this platform. one woman who is very happy. thank you very much on catherine. some random members of the public are counting of ballots. i know we have these projections, but votes are being counted just next door to hear. you can get more later from bordeaux. thank you. it is interesting, because usually the
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publicans is interesting, because usually the publica ns and the is interesting, because usually the publicans and the socialists do the counting but because they were eliminated in the first round they did not turn up to count. so they have been short of people to count in polling stations around the country. here are some messages from people speaking to macron. the outgoing presidents, whose approval rating is at 14%, deeply unpopular, he says, all my wishes for the country's success. and also the former prime minister, who really counts himself as a social democrat rather than a man of the hard left, he says, we are aiming at building a large and cohesive presidential majority in parliament. i salute a beautiful large victory for emmanuel macron. a lot of people have been inspected later in whether he might go over to en marche!, might stand for them or at least align himself with them. just one other to give
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you, the republican's vice president, says emmanuelle macron is president, says emmanuelle macron is president this evening through no real desire or enthusiasm. for the rightness is no time for resigning or compromising. change in power is still possible. the are putting up putting up a fierce fight. let me reintroduce you to the representative from konta public. your reaction? there is a little relief official but at the same time i can't help but think that 11 and a half million people voted for marine le pen, twice as many as when her father ran for president, that means many french people support that kind of idea. at the same time marine le pen said she would reframe her
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party. she has been working on mainstreaming her party for years and now she is going further, meaning she will settle her party into the french republic. now the france not an alp has deep roots into the french landscape. emmanuel macron said tonight this was of victory over hate, a victory for hope and optimism. do you detect some of that hope and optimism among those who did not vote? no. i have seen many people voting for emmanuel macron without any enthusiasm. it is funny for him to say here is the face of china which, he was —— the face of china which, he was —— the face of china which, he was —— the face of change, because he was part of the old system and is not proposing anything radically new. many people are tired of seeing people coming from the same school,
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raised in the same system, they are willing to see people changing the face of... he is changing the face but only on the surface. when you go out polling people, do you detect that people don't really know what emmanuel macron stands for? a lot of people have said his platform has been pretty vague, maybe intentionally. i think rob lee also that explains that only 36% of the french people are believing in his programme, which will raise problems afterwards. i think what you just talked about optimism and pessimism is true because actually there are a big selection, a sort of x—ray, for the french society, and there are many divided lines. when we see our polling surveys at kantar public,
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this is when people between future prospects, people that are able to project themselves into the future, project themselves into the future, project their children in the future and the others. you have of course differences between workers and cultural professionals, etc, between high and low incomes, but mostly this is about future prospects. this is about emotion less than a programme. now i think he will have to prove also that he substantially has something to bring to the society and it will be hard. and thatis society and it will be hard. and that is the point. when you look at the first round vote, nine of the ten districts with the highest unemployment rates in the country went to marine le pen. there is a direct correlation between unemployment and the france that nl. despair and the feeling that the
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syste m despair and the feeling that the system does not support a large part of the population. we need to think about the fact that macron was not supported by people who were enthusiastic. half of the people who voted for him did so to prevent marine le pen from being elected. it was marine le pen from being elected. it was not the highest conviction or sentiments that would bring someone new to the chair. it was not like the first election of barack obama. it was to do something for someone that would prevent is. i think many people went to demonstrate last year because of many of the policies that macron supported in the government. he will need to face those people because according what he sounds to because according what he sounds to be likely to propose, many people will be angry and he will have to face them in the streets and that is his next challenge. you are also a
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civil rights activist. i had an interesting conversation with a taxi driver. he was algerian. he was telling me he does not feel french or algerian, but stuck in the middle. in the tenement building he lives in everybody is algerian. he says nobody feels like voting for either candidate. they feel totally cut off from french society. that is a story we have heard time and again since 2005 and the riots then, from people who live in that area. when isa people who live in that area. when is a president in this country going to get a grip of the situation and sort out the divisions? i think there is a systemic racism which needs to be addressed. i have not been hearing anyone address it. if you are black or arab and young you are 20 times more likely to be checked by the police. now with their sense of urgency it has the
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strongest meaning. we need to have politicians who take that into account. we need policies to make sure everyone in the population, whether you are black, arab or asian, you feel french, you have the feeling that your life matters as much as the other lives. when he talks about a renewal in french politics, is there an appetite for this national debate on you say the racism that there is in french society, certainly getting into the divisions in the suburbs of the big cities? i think we need to face our history because france is a democratic country and it is something which is part of our history, but whenever you see any major, it is male white people. it is something which needs to be
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addressed and something that needs to be displayed. everyone needs the feeling of belonging and that is something which needs to be tackled. do you have figures about this issue? i think french people are expecting big changes when it comes to creating diversity in the political landscape. this was also promises coming from the left. this was promises coming from the left. this was the difference between the two populism we have in this election, between the right populism, really nationale stick, and the populism from the left which is more around diversity and multiculturalism. i think this is something which is put on the table right now and needs to be addressed. well, there will be
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many people in that society who will be very pleased that marine le pen has been defeated in this election. she was quick to concede to emmanuel macron. james reynolds has been where marine le pen is spending her evening and he had this reaction as the projections came out. they will have to look at it in the long term. they will have to measure their progress and election by—election, decade by decade. they started in 1974 with 0.74% of the vote. in 2002 jean—marie le pen got 18% of the vote. it looks like marine le pen has by and large double herfather‘s vote. that is a source of optimism but i think there will be a disappointment that they did not reach 40% of the vote. i did think they can quite say they are one step away from winning the next election. there is clearly a lot more work to be done to persuade the other part
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of france that this party is electable. and they will go one to the parliamentary elections in january in fairly healthy form. they will want to take a number of seats in the parliament? yes, and they start from a meagre base. they have two mps out of 577 in the national assembly. in some ways, the only way for them is up. assembly. in some ways, the only way forthem is up. it assembly. in some ways, the only way for them is up. it does give you a sense of the amount of work that marine le pen has to do in order to make sure that the front national becomes the opposition force she wa nts becomes the opposition force she wants it to become. you cannot say you are the main opposition party if you are the main opposition party if you only have two mps. just looking at some of the other polls as we talk to, we have one which is pretty similarto talk to, we have one which is pretty similar to the one we have been showing you from kantar public. 65% for showing you from kantar public. 65% foer showing you from kantar public. 65% for mr macron and 34 for mrs the pen. —— marine le pen. another one
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has mr macron on 65.1% and my down le pen on 34.9%. they are all pretty much of a muchness. really the front national would have wanted to hit 40%, but when you compare the 11 million votes that the front national got in this boat with a 4.8 her father got national got in this boat with a 4.8 herfather got in 2002, national got in this boat with a 4.8 her father got in 2002, it does show how the party is performing over the long—term? how the party is performing over the long-term? and i think that is their point. they are a movement which measures their progress in decades, not single elections. they started at 0.74%, they got up to 18% in 2002 and they are up to the mid—30s. they will say look at the long—term trajectory, look at how they are increasing their vote. they will
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also be pleased by the amount of legitimacy they have. they're in mind it was a fringe movement. a lot of parts of france boycotted them and ignored them. i think they will now feel they can no longer be ignored. the question is whether marine le pen can turn to her own supporters say we are one step away from winning the next election. it is hard to think that someone who got 34% of the vote can say that. james reynolds there at marine le pen's headquarters. let's take you back to the moment when it was confirmed that emmanuel macron was confirmed that emmanuel macron was confirmed as president. this is how his supporters reacted when the figures flashed up on the screen. cheering an anxious moment perhaps. they've
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perhaps knew they were lucky to be celebrating but you can see the pure, unadulterated joy there. celebrating but you can see the pure, unadulteratedjoy there. it was an unprecedented election with none of the candidates from the two major parties. it was a campaign with twists and turns. translation: they are trying to oppose the —— impose the full veil, prayer in the streets, the submission of winning, a ban on skirts, banned from work. translation: i have decided i will
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not be a candidate in the presidential election, nor will i seeka presidential election, nor will i seek a new mandate as president. because of how important this election is, i also want you to know that i am supporting emmanuel macron to lead you forward. en marche, vive le france. it has at times been bitterly contested and i am not sure it has gone the way of healing the divisions in france. i guess we will see in divisions in france. i guess we will seeinjune divisions in france. i guess we will see in june when divisions in france. i guess we will see injune when all parties contest 577 seats in parliament. emmanuel macron will need a majority or a least a cohesive coalition in the parliament in order to force through the platform that he has put forward. with me on the balcony is rokhaya diallo a journalist and civil rights activist and guenaelle gauu civil rights activist and guenaelle gault from kantar public. we are
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going to talk later at ten o'clock about a poll you have been holding back. you will ta ntalise about a poll you have been holding back. you will tantalise us with a poll on the parliamentary elections which might give us what, a clue about which way the country will go? probably, this is now the new challenge for emmanuel macron. we need to be in mind that there will bea need to be in mind that there will be a third round. crucially important? once again he may not be ina important? once again he may not be in a position to govern, despite the fa ct in a position to govern, despite the fact he is president. there are four phases. the first one is a majority. we will know more about that. the second one is a coalition a bit like angela merkel and the third one is a coalition but depending on the ideas, projects etc and those two are not at all in our culture as french people, and the first one,
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this is accreditation. we have had right—wing prime minister is, and left—wing presidents and vice versa. we have had this three times. it sits well the french people, less the politicians! it works well, a grand coalition? once again it is not exactly in our culture, but why not? it was not in our culture to get a very young president so...” would say the coalition worked rather well in the uk when the conservatives and liberal democrats came together. what is fascinating about the macron movement, i keep wanting to call it a party, but it isa wanting to call it a party, but it is a movement, it is how it has grown from the grassroots. one campaign manager said they had brought in a company which worked for president obama and they asked people for just for president obama and they asked people forjust ten, for president obama and they asked people for just ten, 20, for president obama and they asked people forjust ten, 20, 50 euros contributions. from that they have
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been able to spark an incredible movement of young people. there was that but there was also the fascination of the media which made emmanuel macron very visible in the mainstream media. he made slimani cove rs of mainstream media. he made slimani covers of newspapers and magazines. he really entered into the french imagination very quickly. many people who voted for him, many young people, because he had in contrary to the other candidates, very positive speech, positive discourse. evenif positive speech, positive discourse. even if i don't really know what he stands for. it is very vague. you had many people who supported him but without really knowing what they would get. he had support from other candidates. it is difficult to see how he will govern because we have four different hypotheses. we will go to james reynolds shortly but
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there was no pretence at fairness in there was no pretence at fairness in the media in this second round. they ganged up behind emmanuel macron, do you have a problem with that as a journalist? people point to the front national as a fascist party and we can have a debate about that, but there was no pretence at fairness, was there? i think it is important to remind people of the roots of the front national. marine le pen had been cleaning up the history of the party but we have to remind people that there were people related to neo—nazis. at the same time, the relationship we marine le pen and journalists is important to focus on. she has been many time revoking manyjournalists focus on. she has been many time revoking many journalists and focus on. she has been many time revoking manyjournalists and not allowing them to cover the stories from her hq and that means she is not really supporting the freedom of the press. we have seen many journalists have been kicked out of
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the hq of marine le pen and she wanted to pick the journalists who would follow her. ok, thank you. we have a special results programme now from paris on the second round of the presidential election. emmanuel macron will become the next president at the age of 39, he is just about to speak. let's see what he's saying. well actually he's not speaking, what you're actually watching is a rather peculiar backroom view of his
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headquarters. i told you he's going to make a speech, a more sombre speech before he went to the louvre for a celebration with his supporters. these are pictures from outside his ho. we will dip into his speech. he clearly betting on the powder and preparing speak any second now. james reynolds i think is at marine le pen's headquarters. if we need to interrupt james weighell. we were just talking about this treatment of marine le pen in the mainstream media in france and i made the point, and she's made it many times that there was no real pretence of fairness about how she was covered —— james reynolds. pretence of fairness about how she was covered ——james reynolds. what are they saying at the pen headquarters? much the same thing. the media may say that the coverage was fair but the media in the second
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round have been accused of peddling propaganda against le pen sochi has not got her message. that is a message that a lot of the supporters of the party have said. the media have said they were simply investigating the policies of the front national. seeing whether what it is saying now stood up to what it has said in the past. we're just watching the french television because we're waiting for emmanuel macron to appear. as we wait for him, marine le pen obviously had some idea that this wasn't going to be her victory tonight because the party at marine le pen headquarters was to be brought to a close at 10pm, so they obviously had a spear through the day that it wasn't going their way? this is a small venue. if
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you were looking for a venue in which to hold a medium—sized wedding, this is where you would come. it isn't a huge campaign venue at all. so when we got here, the smallness of the venue gave an indication of what the campaign was thinking. they put out several dozen supporters in front of marine le pen and on the stroke of the results being predicted, they were booing. she gave a speech but it was an important speech, talking about transforming the movement. i spoke toa transforming the movement. i spoke to a senior official who said that it would be a new party under a new name but with many of the same ideas. i said that if it is the same party it is the same ideas but he said others would join them. they must reflect on this, is 35% good enough? they may have wanted 40% to make sure she is unequivocally the opposition leader. is 35% enough to
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say you are the opposition leader to put you one step away from the 2022 election? we'll have to find out. that's an interesting thought. she's had a very public row with her father, d marine le pen, saying that she hasn't run a very good campaign —— jean—marie le pen. she hasn't run a very good campaign -- jean-marie le pen. she is saying that she doubled his vote in 2002. he barely increased the front national‘s vote in the second round but she doubled that this time and this is what they are clinging onto, saying yes, it is a loss but it is a success because they have doubled the second round performance and from their point of view they have smashed the republican front by which the other parties would unite against the national front. they believe they have put a crack in that tonight. i amjust
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believe they have put a crack in that tonight. i am just keeping and ion that tonight. i am just keeping and i on the projector down here because emmanuel macron is going to talk and we wa nt emmanuel macron is going to talk and we want to bring in his speech. he seems to be rehearsing at the moment. we'lljust remind you of the projections we've had, pretty convincing. according to the projections we've seen, 65%, macron, and marine le pen, 34%. translation: gratitude, it is a great honour and a great responsibility because nothing was written in advance and i would like to say thank you to you, thank you from the bottom of my heart. my gratitude is for those of you who voted for me and supported me. i will neverfor get you who voted for me and supported me. i will never for get you. you who voted for me and supported me. i will neverfor get you. i will put all my efforts, all my care to be worthy of the trust you put in me. but it is to all of you, the citizens of my country, that i wish
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to speak, whatever your choice. there were lots of problems that made us weak for too long and i'm aware of all of them, economic difficulties, social problems, democratic difficulties, the moral wea kness democratic difficulties, the moral weakness of the country. and tonight, i want to tell you in the republican spirit, marine le pen was my adversary. i know... i note the rage, the society, the doubt that many of you expressed. it is under my responsibility to hear them and to protect the weakest and to organise solidarity and fighting against any form of discrimination and inequality and making sure in a resolute way that your security will be guaranteed. and i will also
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guarantee the unity of the nation. because behind the words i've just pronounced i know full well that there are faces, there are men and women and children, there are families, their whole lives and behind that, it is you and all the people around you. tonight, it's to all of you that i'm speaking. because altogether, you make up the population of france and we have a duty in relation to our country, we are the heirs of a grand history with a humanistic message to the world, it is our duty to pass it on to our children first but also, more important, we have to carry it into the future. we've got to give it new blood. and i will protect and defend france, its vital interests, its image, its message, it's a commitment i take before you. i will
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defend and protect europe, the common destiny that the people on our continent have voted upon. our way of living, of being free, of carrying together our enterprises and hopes. and i want to make stronger the link between europe and the countries and government that make europe and its citizens. to all of the nations of the world, i give the salute of the friendly france, a brotherly france and i say to the head of these countries that france will be there to defend peace and international cooperation and the commitment taken regarding climate change. and to all of you i am saying that france will be in the first place to fight against terrorism in france but also at international level. for as long as
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that but all must last, we will be there fighting, without any weakness. my fellow citizens, it is a new page in our long history that is being turned tonight and i want that page to be a page of hope and trust recovered. the renewal of our public life is something that's going to start from tomorrow onwards and people list approach —— pluralistic approach will be the basis of our action and i won't be stocked by any difficulty or obstacle. stocked by any difficulty or o bsta cle. i stocked by any difficulty or obstacle. i will act in a determined manner that is respecting all of you because food work, through school and culture, that's how we're going to build a better culture —— because through work. to all of you, people in france, my fellow citizens, tonight i would like to salute president hollande because he has
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worked for our country for the last few years and for the next five yea rs, few years and for the next five years, my responsibility is going to be to calm fears and make us believe in optimism again and to recover the conquest there it which is the best definition of the french spirit —— the conquest spirit. i will gather together the men and women who are ready to face the challenges that we have to expect. some of these challenges are also pieces of luck, like the digital revolution, restarting europe, and others are threats, like terrorism. i will fight, i will fight with threats, like terrorism. i will fight, i will fight with all my strength against the division which is so deleterious to us and that is how we are going to give to the french nation, to all of you, in his professional life, in its personal life, the chances that france owes
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to its citizens. let's love france from tonight and for the five years to come. in a very humble way, we have total devotion and determination. i'm going to serve our country, going to serve france. long live the republic and long—lived france. long live the republic and long-lived france. so, emmanuel macron making a very sober statement at his headquarters. i was thinking, very different to what we saw in 2012 when president hollande became president. on that occasion he was in the south of the country. he had a constituency which macron doesn't, he has never been elected. he went to speak to his supporters down there and then he went to paris and he made speeches from the stage. he made very clear that as a 39—year—old man he wanted to make a sober and serious statements to
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unite people before he heads here to the louvre. you can see the pictures from the louvre where they will be a big celebration. i'm joined by a journalist and broadcaster. christine, no great surprises, we thought this may happen two weeks ago, that macron would be the next president. he is two years younger than the average person in france. it may not be a surprise to us, but it isa it may not be a surprise to us, but it is a huge achievement. it is unheard of in the political history of this country. he is a man, 39 yea rs of this country. he is a man, 39 years old, the youngest ever, who has just talked about hope in this nation. all of this grumbling, so pessimistic about itself. now, this country has the face of a young man
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who talks about hope. this performance, having no constituency, having never been elected to office before... 13 months ago when he launched his movement, the chattering class in paris were sneering saying, who does he think he is? well, he's the president. of course he has had an incredible series of lucky strikes because no one would have imagined this presidential campaign to have so many... the wings of fortune. he was courageous when he launched his party and he took the right opportunity and the right time. luck is also a big part of political life. behind him, the french flag and the european flag. we are told
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he will make his first visit as president to soldiers, probably overseas, and then to berlin to see angela merkel and there will be many people in brussels who are going to be breathing a sigh of relief this evening. yes, for two reasons, this isa evening. yes, for two reasons, this is a clear victory against euro phobia. france, as in many other countries, you have a lot of euro scepticism but that is different from euro phobia. euro phobia we have seen in the uk, unfortunately. it means that you hate europe so much that you want to leave it. tonight it's clear that part of mr macron's victory against le pen is a victory against euro phobia. the french don't want to leave the the eu, they don't want to leave the european union, they want to remain but they can still be eurosceptic, that will be a challenge for macron. there is something more that christine told us about, it's trying
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to fight against franco scepticism. this is painful for this country. trying to promote what he called a more proactive and positive optimism in the future, yes, we can. this was pa rt of in the future, yes, we can. this was part of his campaign and part of his success is connected to it. easier said than done. these turning points are to be noted in france as regards europe and the world. you will both access that when you look at the first round vote and who voted for le pen and some of the other candidates, nearly 50% of the french people were eurosceptic? when you look at the motives for which voters supported macron in the first round, you don'ts europe first. so you shouldn't over interpret those voting for macron as pro—europe and
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those voting elsewhere as anti—europe. there is more euro scepticism in france than there was ten years ago, it's true. macron's challenge cup the first and foremost isa challenge cup the first and foremost is a national challenge, regarding education, unemployment, taxation, social protection, these are a national challenge is to be fixed with international solutions. euro scepticism had nothing to do about that. do you think that the french people want more europe? is this campaign was about a deeply integrated and reformed europe, but more deeply tied together. —— this campaign was about. europe has been the scapegoat of the euro phobia as
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well as a degree of euro scepticism. but the french have very contradictory feelings about that. when you look at the europe boerrigter, a majority of the french area boerrigter, a majority of the french are a pro—europe and more than two yea rs are a pro—europe and more than two years ago “— are a pro—europe and more than two years ago —— when you look at the french barometer. they don't want to leave europe, which is why marine le pen fumbled about that issue. the issueis pen fumbled about that issue. the issue is very much the reforms that france must conduct and neither hollande zero sarkozy were able to put through. so europe became a kind of facade, it's because of europe, but no, it is because france did not conduct the reforms that were conducted in germany, italy, spain, evenin conducted in germany, italy, spain, even in britain in the 1970s. so there is a confusion, it seems to me. a lot of political exploitation,
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as if all of the problems of france we re as if all of the problems of france were because of europe. it's not true. the problems are due firstly because of the difficulty in this country to reform and that will be macron's main challenge, how to conduct reform, starting with very stifling labour laws, for instance, and how to proceed with a parliamentary majority which will be decided by these forthcoming elections in june. we will talk more ina elections in june. we will talk more in a moment. let's hearfrom the marine le pen camp because james reynolds has been there and he's been speaking to the election coordinator. we have 3596 of people who are convinced of our programme. it's not the case of mr macron, who has 65% of the vote, but 60% of his
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vote rs has 65% of the vote, but 60% of his voters voted against marine le pen. in any western democracy, a 30 point loss is a huge loss. no, i don't think so, it depends on what's going to happen in the next weeks because, asi to happen in the next weeks because, as i said, only 40% of the voters of the manual macro —— of emmanuel macron voted for his policies. one must look to the political dynamic. todayis must look to the political dynamic. today is not the end, it is a start, a beginning and we have a political basis on which we can construct an alternative to mr macron's ideas. marine le pen at the podium talked about transforming her movement. what did she mean by that, a new party? yes, a new political movement, a new political alliance
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that will gather all figures and leaders, all the parties that are convinced by the a patriotic idea. which ones? one party got 5% of the vote in the first round. many republicans... was tonight the end of the front national, the party founded in 1972? no, because the front national is only a name. if you look at the political and humanly a la tea, this is going to be the hard—core of a big movement —— political and human reality. critics will say that they can see through a name change. if the policies are the same, if some of the policies towards minorities are the policies towards minorities are the same, then the name doesn't matter, the problems remain. we are
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not against minorities, we want to restore the french identity and french sovereignty. france, when it was french sovereignty. france, when it was proud of its ideas, was never against minorities. i am from a minority and i am close to marine le pen. what you say now epitomises the propaganda that was made against us between the two rounds of the election. we have been criminalised because we have been treated like nazis, the extreme right. of course when you repeat this every day and night, you win the ballot. at marine le pen's headquarters. some news from nigel farage, who gave his support to marine le pen. he is quoted as saying that mr macron offers five more years of failure,
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more power to the eu and the continuation of open borders. if marine sticks in there she can win in 2022. that's the opinion of nigel farage. the projection we have so far, you'll see that according to the pollsters that are helping us this evening, they predict that emmanuel macron has taken 65.5% of the vote compared to 34.5% of the vote for marine le pen. she got 11 million votes. quite a sizeable chunk more than her father got in 2002, he got 4.5 million then. although she has a lot of criticism from her father although she has a lot of criticism from herfather in recent although she has a lot of criticism from her father in recent days, christine she can say that she has done better than him. she also killed her father politically, done better than him. she also killed herfather politically, which is how she managed to weaken the far right to a point. how awful
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performance in the tv debate, the violence, the vocabulary, you know, the old style french far right, going back before world war ii, it came back. but she is a formidable politician. there's no reason not to acknowledge that her performance has been remarkable altogether. 11 million people voting for her. it will be interesting to see how many seats the far right will get in the next national assembly because again we have a voting system that is so different from yours, which always favours the main parties. for the time being, the fn favours the main parties. for the time being, the fm only has two seats in the national assembly so interesting to see how more she gets. but it is obvious that she has
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managed to actually impose the far right‘s themes, the populist themes, a lwa ys right‘s themes, the populist themes, always to talk about identity, protectionism, fear, we are all in decline, and these things will indeed remain in the national debate. that's the point, isn't it, regardless of the result this evening she has had an effect on this election because in large part she has moved the debate to the right. you mentioned nigel farage. ukip, he only had one seat, sometimes two in the chamber. and he managed... why does he bother about winning elections in britain? what is at stake is not the institutional victory because it is difficult for marine le pen to win. we have seen
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this in 2015, in the regional elections she couldn't win. it isn't the institutional victory she is expecting, it is a political one. she has succeeded partly. what will be very challenging in the next few weeks and months will be to see how the traditional right will be —— traditional right will behave. just time to tell you that donald trump has been on twitter, he likes to do that! tweeting his congratulations to emmanuel macron on his big win, saying he looks forward to working with him. someone who showed some support for marine le pen over the last few days but sending a warm message to macron. we are expecting mr macron to turn up at the louvre over the next half an hour and we will have plenty more analysis for
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you. labour says it will not raise income tax for anyone earning less than £80,000 a year as part of an election pledge to low and middle earners. the shadow chancellor, john mcdonnell, said those earning over the £80,000 threshold would be asked to pay "a bit more" to help pay for public services. the conservatives say they have no plan to raise income tax but have so far refused to completely rule it out. our political correspondent ben wright reports. it was a slogan used by tony blair, now revived by labour's new leadership. setting out what he called a big deal to upgrade the economy, john mcdonnell promised not to raise vat or national insurance
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for anyone, but said the top 5% of earners would pay more. if labour is elected next month, we will guarantee for the next five years, there will be no income tax rises, for all those earning less than £80,000 a year. labour is now the party of low taxes for middle and lower earners. mr mcdonnell said people earning more than £80,000 a year would pay a modest amount more but the rates and details would have to wait for the manifesto. the conservatives have promised not to raise vat but have so far made no matching pledge on national insurance or income tax. today, the tories said labour was going back to the past. this is a clear statement of intent. they want to raise taxes, they want to penalise business, they want to penalise wealth creation and i think they will end up wrecking the economy as they have done in the past. the total amount of income tax raised in 2016 is just over £169 billion.
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the top 5% of uk earners, labour's target group for tax rises, paid just over 47% of that, close to £80 billion. you cannot make a really big change to the amount of money that is available just by focusing on people over 80,000 a year, partly because they already pay an awful lot of tax and a lot more than they did a few years ago, but partly because if you really want significant amounts of money, you have to do something the politicians don't like doing, which is hit the majority of people, which is where vat and the national insurance and a lot of income tax is actually paid. you are pledging to increase tax on high earners have to pay for public services and borrow billions for infrastructure, but that has been labour's message sincejeremy corbyn became leader. why do you think it can turn things around for labour in the last four weeks of this general election campaign when it seems it has not worked so far? i think there is an opportunity now in the general election campaign which we have not had before since
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jeremy corbyn was elected leader. i think we can turn the polls around and i genuinely think we can secure a majority onjune 8th. many of the bankers and financiers who work here would pay more income tax under labour's plan and this is the first general election for many years, when there is a stark choice developing between labour and the conservatives with how the economy should be run and how money should be raised and spent. the liberal democrats say their manifesto will include a commitment to keep the "triple lock" on pensions this would guarantee they rise by as much as wages, inflation or 2.5%, whichever is highest. but pensioners with annual incomes above £45,000 would lose the winter fuel payment. labour has also pledged to retain the triple lock; theresa may has declined to say whether the conservatives would do so. more than eighty nigerian schoolgirls kidnapped by the militant group boko haram have met the country's president
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after being freed in a prisoner swap. the girls from chibok were among more than two—hundred who were taken three years ago. the government says they'll be given medical checks before being reunited with theirfamilies. around 100 others are still being held. welcome back to our special results programme, i welcome back to our special results programme, lam welcome back to our special results programme, i am christian fraser in paris, the city looking resplendent tonight, this is the arc de triomphe, the flag fluttering there has been hung for the celebrations tomorrow, may eight. it will mark the anniversary of the end of the second world war, may eight, 1945 victory day in france and indeed francois hollande the outgoing
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president and the president elect emmanuel macron will be here tomorrow at the flame of the unknown soldier. the first official duty of emmanuel macron as president elect and we understand that francois hollande perhaps the next table go to say goodbye to the german chancellor. we are expecting emmanuel macron to appear at the louvre for the party already underway. if you are justjoining us, he's set to become the next president, at 39 the centrist party leader will become the youngest president of france since 1848 when the nephew of napoleon bonaparte was the nephew of napoleon bonaparte was the leader. he has beaten the far right candidate marine le pen and has taken more than 65% of the vote according to exit polls. marine le pen has conceded defeat but told supporters that with 11 million votes the front national was now clearly the main party of opposition. british prime minister
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theresa may has congratulated the president—elect on his success, saying france is one of our closest allies and we look forward to working with the new president on a wide range of shared priorities. there's also been a message from the german chancellor angela merkel who said the win was a strong victory for a strong and united europe. and in the last few minutes the president of the united states donald trump has also congratulated mr macron and says he looks forward to working with him in the near future. let's just remind to working with him in the near future. let'sjust remind our selves of those projected results. if you arejust of those projected results. if you are just joining of those projected results. if you arejustjoining us you of those projected results. if you are justjoining us you will see on your screens that mr macron took 65.5% of the vote. that's the latest projection, compared to full marine le pen. there are horns sounding behind us, people are flying the french flag out of the windows of their car. with me is a well—known
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journalist, christine, and yves from the jacques delors institute. emmanuel macron spoke earlier about the responsibilities of becoming president of france. translation:l long page in our history is being turned tonight and i want that page to bea turned tonight and i want that page to be a page of hope and trust recovered. the renewal of our public life is something that is going to start from tomorrow on what and the great pluralist approach and vitality will be the basis of my action and i will not be stopped by any difficulty or obstacle. i will act ina any difficulty or obstacle. i will act in a determined manner but respecting all of you, because through work, through school, through work, through school, through culture, that is how we are going to build a betterfuture. to
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all of you, people of france, tonight, i would like to salute francois hollande because for five yea rs francois hollande because for five years he has worked for our country. and for the next five years my responsibility is going to be to calm fears and to make us believe in optimism again, and to recover the conquered spirit which is the best definition of the french spirit. my responsibility will be to gather together all the men and women willing to face the challenges that we have to expect. some of these challenges are also pieces of luck like the digital revolution, the restart of europe, and others are threats, like terrorism. i will fight. i will fight threats, like terrorism. i will fight. i will fight with all my strength against the division which is so delirious to us. and that is how we are going to give to the
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french nation, to all of you in its professional life, and its personal and familial life, the chances that france owes to its citizens. that's love france and from tonight and for the five years to come. —— lets love france. in a very humble way but with total devotion, with total determination, i am going to serve our country, to serve france on your behalf. long live the republic and long—lived france. behalf. long live the republic and long-lived france. emmanuel macron speaking earlier. let's chill you the pictures of the louvre. a real party is underway. thousands of people there. you will i'm sure be familiar with the glass pyramid in front of the tuileries gardens. will speak to front of the tuileries gardens. will speakto damian front of the tuileries gardens. will speak to damian grammaticas who is there in a second. just watching the
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scene that there are a lot of people heading down the champs—elysees towards the louvre and when he appears there in about half an hour he will get quite the reception. earlier the national front leader marine le pen did have something to say about the result, she did phone mr macron to concede having seen the initial projections, let's hear from her. having seen the initial projections, let's hearfrom her. translation: the people have chosen a new president. i called emmanuel macron to congratulate him on being elected. believe me come in the main interests of the country, i wish him success in the face of the challenges he will face and i want to thank the 11 million french people that gave me their vote. through that massive and historical choice, the french shows the patriot and republican alliance as the main opposition to the project of that new president. the political parties
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that have chosen to vote for mr macron are no longer legitimate to represent an alternative force or even a credible opposition. the first round showed that there was total decomposition of the normal political french life and that second—hand is a recomposition round, but division between patriots and globalists. marine le pen trying to take comfort from the 35.5% of votes she won, long way behind emmanuel macron. emmanuel macron is at the louvre, there can't be many better settings for a party like this one, getting underway, damian grammaticas. yes, you've just joined us as underway, damian grammaticas. yes, you've justjoined us as the party is really kicking into gear. the bands have been on stage and they are getting louder and louder. the crowds here, hundreds of them,
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they've all been waving their flags, there was a moment when everyone waited for the polls to close and the projection to go on screen. there was a big cheer from the projection to go on screen. there was a big cheerfrom here the projection to go on screen. there was a big cheer from here and then the party began. when mr macron are delivered his first speech whole place fell silent and everyone listened, which is quite extraordinary actually. everyone taking in his message about how he was going to respond to what he had learned from the election, deliver and this message of change at home but also to those who had voted for his opponent, marine le pen. and now they are waiting for him to come here in half an hour or so. and as you are saying, i'm sure that the reception will be huge for him, because the feeling here, i think, isjoy at because the feeling here, i think, is joy at the size of the victory and also the promise, many people
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who voted for mr macron because of his promise to bring something new, something different. it's getting louder and louder. they say that this is going to go on late into the night. we will let you enjoy the party for the moment. thank you very much for the moment. just keeping an eye on emmanuel macron's headquarters, he is due to leave there in the next few minutes. you can see the exterior shots outside the hq. let's speak to christine ockrent. let's speak about the position of the president. he is the head of state and often the french have elected a much older figure, like jacques chirac or fossil mitterrand. that fossil mitterrand. they have all been statesman—like. how are people going to react to a 39—year—old taking the top job?
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first of all they elected him. i think that shows that there is a longing in this country. the french tend to be very depressed when you look at all the data, they are supposed to be the most depressed people in europe. and yet the new face of france is that young man. talking about hope. so i think it sends a signal which is very strong indeed, although public opinion is very divided, very fragmented. i think it should be stressed that many people didn't even bother to go and vote today. about one quarter of french voters. so he will have, on the one hand, i think, his speech was a good sign of that, talking about the need to you at night this divided nation. —— the need to
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unite. his problem will be to find support in parliament after the elections next june, support in parliament after the elections nextjune, in order to get some results. and the first issue in this country, a terrible issue, is unemployment, especially for young people. 25% of the young people in this country are unemployed. so he will have to show that he can make a difference. and the difference also is that he hasn't made that many promises, compared to his predecessors. maybe it's a better sign of not being such a disappointment as indeed francois hollande has been. back to that image of the president, have the french changed their view over the yea rs, french changed their view over the years, nicolas sarkozy was a break with the past, he was a young, of the present president, it used to be that the president was above the
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political fray and the prime ministers would take the heat for any political row. it's different now. what has changed but that is true in all our democracies is that it is the relationship between the citizen and the issues of concern to him or her. and it has to do with smartphones, all social media, i think there's more impatience. people don't want to wait. we all live and that electronic pace and it makes thejob live and that electronic pace and it makes the job of the politician even more difficult than ever before —— we live at that electronic pace. and i think there's a relationship again between the individual citizens, the government, the prime minister in your country, not the queen, but the prime minister... that's what i mean, our head of state is above the political fray and that is to beat away in france but it is not that
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way any more. it never has been. the president of the fifth republic has a lot of power. much more so than the german chancellor. but he could make the prime minister take the fall. just for the image and everything but he's very much hands on in the actual politics of the country. he is young, 39, the woman who will be beside him, with made a lot of this, is much older, 24 years older than him, his former drama teacher. she has really been, in a way, there throughout his life. very much so. he has been insisting on her importance throughout the campaign and she has become very popular. and i think there's also something very new in other
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circumstances, people might have been shocked and said, how strange. we are all used to having very old gentlemen with young women. this time it's the reverse. and the reverse of the us president because melania trump is 24 years younger than mrtrump. melania trump is 24 years younger than mr trump. there's no comparison possible even between the two presidents. seriously, brigitte macron has played a role and will play a role and they are obviously a very, very strong partnership. which has indeed mattered very much in his audacity and in the challenge that he has set for himself. again, brigitte macron will be an important pa rt brigitte macron will be an important part of the new presidency. ok. we've received some updated projections from the polling agency helping us this evening. emmanuel macron has slightly stretched his
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lead, 65.7%, upfrom macron has slightly stretched his lead, 65.7%, up from 65.5%. votes are being counted all the time i run the country. the polls have been closed for well over an hour. marine le pen on 34.3%. hugh schofield our paris correspondent, hasjoined us on the balcony. what are you making of this? one thing that slightly worries me is that i feel this air of relief in paris that it's all all right, it's fine, the right side has one. everyone is out on the streets celebrating and one feels that it has returned to normality. whereas of course the reality is that there isa of course the reality is that there is a huge movement in france and around europe, in france, in britain, in america, of dissatisfaction, of, i don't know,
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nativist people worried about losing their jobs nativist people worried about losing theirjobs or their sense nativist people worried about losing their jobs or their sense of nativist people worried about losing theirjobs or their sense of who they are. that has not got away. one can easily get caught up in this sense of things going back to the way they were before and thank goodness there's a man in charge who was goodness there's a man in charge who was going to carry on in the same way with european leaders that we all used to. and rather forgetting that behind all this and the excitement of all that has happened, our profound changes in society and in the way we operate. you're absolutely right of course. it is very much what emmanuel macron has actually recognised in his speech. it was very important indeed, that first speech was crucial for him. his speech after the first round was a disappointment but tonight he spoke very much to these priorities that you mention. for me one thing to his great credit is that he doesn't go out to please. in the way
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that francois hollande did, for example, he is now about to leave, he made his famous speech about finance to please the left. then he said other things to please other people. at no point, and this is his brilliance, emmanuel macron, does he ta ke brilliance, emmanuel macron, does he take his message for the audience. he is very consistent. when he is with workers as it was last week he was with workers as it was last week he was saying things that were quite tough for them to swallow. he is a man of immense self possession, immense self belief in a way which could be difficult to swallow in another person, in a man who didn't seem genuinely committed to the public good. i hope for his sake and for france's sake that this balancing act comes off. what you can't accuse him of is tailoring his message for different groups. he has said that there are tough times ahead and when he was asked the other day at his last interview, he was other day at his last interview, he was asked what was his message of
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the youth. he didn't say, i will fight for you, i will defend you and the usual pap. he said, it's going to be tough, i will fight to make sure that young people can find their own destiny. and that means removing the blockages in society. that is code. that is saying, i'm a liberal. in a way this is the mirror of what he wants to achieve because it's the older generation, privileged within french society, who have jobs that you can't force a man out of, he's actually forced the establishment out of the top job and presumably he'll put a bit of that into french society. he represents a generation as opposed to the 1968 generation, he's come up behind that. in that generation is an awful lot of frustration with the 1968 generation precisely because of that squatting on public life, getting it good for themselves and not allowing the next generation to express
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itself and be free to innovate, to be entrepreneurs and the rest of it, and he speaks to that. would you agree? very much so. the generation has changed, a total political reshuffling of the landscape. the two extre m e reshuffling of the landscape. the two extreme parties being kicked out. the socialist party in ruins and the conservative party will probably explode sooner or later because you have to or three wings that don't agree on anything and they certainly don't agree on what attitude to have towards the new president. it will be interesting to see how the new president will try to include in the forthcoming government some people, some conservative members, in order to accelerate the splitting up of the
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mainstream conservative party. interesting thoughts. stay with us. we'll go to the louvre and speak to suffer mclauchlan, who i met on friday, someone who has been working for the macron campaign. sophie, you must be pleased with what has happened tonight because you gave up a part of yourjob, you have been working part—time for the macron campaign. what does it mean to you? sophie, can you hear me? i am campaign. what does it mean to you? sophie, can you hear me? iam not sure that sophie can hear me. can you hear me? we'll try it one more time. yes, hi. i'm sorry! tell us what it feels like. i'm sorry, i can barely hear you. tell us what you are thinking tonight. no? i don't
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think we are going to be able to make contact. it's very noisy down there. what you are looking at is his headquarters in the 15th and this month, a break with tradition tonight because he's made a speech earlier. he's been speaking to the people around the country in a sober and serious speech about the challenge that is ahead. you can see the car that's waiting for him there. he is due to travel with his wife brigitte as we've been discussing, 24 years his senior. someone who will play a prominent role in public life. she will not just be in the background. he has bigger plans for her than being first lady of france. maybe he'll talk about that when she joins him on stage in a short while. that's
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the situation at his headquarters. let's remind you of who it is who will become the next french president, we will take a look back at his journey to the ely is a palace. dash to the elysee palace. i , djourou in so yugo, a bit about the man we will come to know an awful lot better
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over the course of the next five yea rs. over the course of the next five years. i have beenjoined by a representative of late republic can and also by laurent. as we are speaking mr macron is on his way to the louvre. laurent, you must be disappointed. what does it mean for your movement now, will you stay aligned to the front national or will you break away again? list tomorrow i am very sad because paradoxically, even if he is not the most unpopular president, francois hollande has been re—elected tonight. through his lookalike, emmanuel macron. that's why our patriotic movement, debout la france, will go on. we will be a true opposition instead of the
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republicans, because the republicans asked french citizens to act emmanuel macron. they are a fake opposition. we will be the true patriotic opposition to mr macron. we'll talk about that more in a second. jacques, your reaction to the election? it is a huge victory, there's no doubt of it. i think it's even too big a victory because things are not going to start now, things are not going to start now, things would be very, very difficult. i just heard things would be very, very difficult. ijust heard that, the last poll said that 61% of the french don't want macron to have huge majority in the national assembly. that's why i think in fact it will be very difficult. ok. we will talk more. thank you both for being with us. stay with us for this
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special results programme. plenty more to come. good evening. a lovely warm spring day for many of us. the warmest day of the year so far in northern ireland and the sunshine in south—east wales, we saw temperatures of 20 degrees. you can see the extent of the sun chan from earlier today breaking up that cloud across southern parts of england, keeping cloud across yorkshire, lincolnshire and north east scotland, under the cloud in aberdeenshire and has been cooler. and through the rest of the evening and overnight we will keep the cloud feeding in of the north sea into north—east scotland, developing more widely in northern and eastern scotland, eastern england and eventually central england, further west in the countryside with clearer skies the temperatures won't be far from freezing, these are the numbers
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more likely in towns and cities. what we have on monday is a west— east split, a cool breeze of the north sea feeding in cloud across central and eastern uk with more sunshine in the west. even with the sunshine in the west. even with the sunshine temperatures will be lower than they were today but we are still looking at the mid to high teens across south—west scotland and also northern ireland and the cloud may break across northern and eastern scotland and north east england at times. through the midlands, yorkshire, linkage, east anglia, sunshine in wales and the west, more in the way of cloud, not just the midlands but for the south—east of england as well particularly cold honours north sea coasts with the wind off the sea. the winds are coming around an area of high pressure that extends back towards greenland. that is dominating our weather for the start of the week at least. again a lot of dry weather on tuesday, one or two showers in the north—east of scotland, more cloud further west,
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not as much sunshine on tuesday, that cloud spreading out a little, bright sunny spells almost anywhere and temperatures typically into the mid teens. so a bit more cloud on tuesday, still got high—pressure on wednesday but things change in the week as pressure drops and we could start to see the first significant rain coming from the south and spreading north across the uk. i heard of that sunny spells, quite warm by day, some clearer skies at night. it could be quite chilly. and then the chances of potentially heavy rain later in the week. hello, welcome to the bbc news french election special. emmanuel macron has beaten his far right rival and will become the next president of france. the moment his supporters learned that he had won. at just supporters learned that he had won. atjust 39, supporters learned that he had won. at just 39, france's supporters learned that he had won. atjust 39, france's youngest ever head of state. he says it is a new era of french history. translation:
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with total devotion and total determination i'm going to serve my country, i'm going to serve france on your behalf. long live the republic and long live france. this is the scene in central paris where emmanuel macron is making his way to a rally with his supporters at the louvre. more than a third of voters chose marine le pen's card like vision. she turned her attention to the coming parliamentary elections. —— far right vision. translation:” will try to have a greater number of people to choose from. turnout at the ballot box was lower than the last three presidential elections. it echoes the disillusionment, for some, with both candidates. we'll have all the kameric from paris as other eu capitals breathe a sigh of
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relief —— all the coverage. germany calls it a victory for a strong and united europe. good evening and welcome to paris where the french have chosen the emmanuel macron to become the next president. at 39 the centrist party leader will be the youngest president of france. he has beaten the far right candidate marine le pen and taken more than 65% of the vote according to the latest projected result. he has called the victory a new era of french history. marine le pen said that with million votes —— with a million —— with 11 million votes, the front national is now the main party of opposition.
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quite a gathering weighty for him —— waiting for him outside the louvre. let's remind you of the projected result is that we have so far. this is from konta publique, who are helping us. marine le pen received 11 million votes, which is a lot more than her father got in 2002, jean—marie le pen. she will consider that a good result for her. let's show you the live pictures. quite dramatic pictures of macron heading through the streets. in the car in front of the police escort there, macron and his wife, brigitte
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macron, 24 years his senior, the first lady of france and she'll play quite a prominent role, he says, in the administration. what that role will be, we'll discover perhaps in the next few days but the president—elect is on his way to the louvre. let's have a look at how the events unfolded. after the most important, eagerly awaited presidential election in recent french history, victory for emmanuel macron. the apparent margin of victory, by 65% to 35% is a relief for supporters to see his win as critical to the future of europe as critical to the future of europe as well as france. a sombre president—elect address the french nation tonight wary of the challenge ahead. translation: it is a new page in ourlong ahead. translation: it is a new page in our long history that is being turned tonight and i want that page
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to bea turned tonight and i want that page to be a page of hope and of trust. the renewal of our public life is something that is going to start from tomorrow onwards and greater moralising asian in our public life, the pluralistic approach will be the basis of our action and i won't be stopped by any obstacle. this had been a desperately divisive campaign in which the gulf between the candidates couldn't have been wider. in mr macron the voters had a centrist, liberal, pro—european champion of globalism. his opponent marine le pen gave voters a radically different option, anti—immigration, wanting to ditch the euro and strengthen france's borders. 47 million people were eligible to vote. the problem for many french voters was that they found neither candidate particularly attractive. the two traditional
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factions, socialists and republicans, failed to make the final round. turnout appears to have been loaned and it is thought that many voted for macron as the lesser of two evils. i'm quite concerned because the candidate i'm going to vote for is not the one i voted for in the first round. but there is still hope that in the five years the president can change some things. i don't want marine le pen to be president, i don't agree with her politics, she is extreme right, anti—immigrant. her politics, she is extreme right, anti-immigrant. translation: french people have chosen a new leader for the republic. the night, le pen telephoned her opponent to congratulate him but in defeat she warned that the traditional hegemony of french politics had been shattered and many are expecting her to challenge again in four years' time. the political parties that have chosen to vote for macron are no longer legitimate to represent the alternative force, or even a credible position. emmanuel macron
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appears almost as happy to wrap himself in the european flag as the french one. he is an unknown quantity who will have to win the trust of those who reluctantly voted for him. leaders from across europe including angela merkel and theresa may have welcomed his win but one question now, how will a macron victory effect the big issue facing the eu: brexit? we can show you the live pictures in paris, macron just arriving at the louvre. we can see that the bands on stage, they have been warming up. i have two guests with me. as you look at these pictures, thousands of people, mainly young people are gathered in paris tonight for macron. he's talking about a new era, that he is the candidate of hope and optimism. what do you say? this is the normal speech of a new
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president whoever he is come at you know. every new president says that this is a new beginning, so it is nothing astonishing, it doesn't surprise me. the difficulty starts tomorrow morning. tonight they celebrate, i understand that perfectly but it doesn't solve the problems of france and i'm pretty sure that macron is not the one to solve them. obviously you're looking towards the parliamentary elections. of course. will there be an attempt for the republicans to drag him to the right? macron? no, it's impossible. he belongs to the left. macron, it's a new attempt to give a new look to the socialists. this is what he's doing, you know. when i hear the men and women he's going to present in our constituency, i'm sorry, we all know that they have links with the socialist party. this
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is kind of reinventing the socialist party. i believe that the french will not give him full power. there is an opinion poll tonight saying that 60 front —— 61% don't want to give him full power in the national assembly, so things are open, it does not mean that everything is set. things are open and i believe we have a good chance to recalibrate, to rebalance power. tonight, he has full power. in a fortnight i think things will be different. you were nodding, laurent. your party is also to the right, debout la france, so if you get some seats are, what are you looking to do here? many republicans are asking mr macron to go back into
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government. but i think this is the sole position and it is a big danger because his electorate are not going to fall him —— follow him. because his electorate are not going to fall him -- follow him. they will have a newjob and a new career. now we have a very important choice. on one hand we can go ahead with mass immigration, uncontrolled globalisation, more taxes. or on the other end we can have a patriot choice which is to take care of french people who are suffering, to ta ke french people who are suffering, to take care of our country, to give back thejobs in france take care of our country, to give back the jobs in france and to lower taxes to spend more and consume more in order to boost the economy. they
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said that your leader, nicolas dupont—aignan, who could have become the leader, only went over because he was broke. absolutely wrong, there was no financial agreement between the front national and our party. is your party in debt? no, because people were supporting us to give us money and they are doing it so we will balance our accounts. you're looking very cynical!” so we will balance our accounts. you're looking very cynical! i tell you frankly, i think that nicolas dupont—aignan has the sole position, going to the national front, i think that was a mistake. i think he made a mistake. he isn't going to the front national at all. we had an agreement for leading france for five years. let's talk about the
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republican party. we know that you have a new leader and he has quite a job on his hands because mr fillon has walked into the sunset. how are you going to keep everybody happy.” believe that those who are going with france, we aren't going to accept it. we must stand united tonight because tomorrow it is anotherjob tonight because tomorrow it is another job and this job tonight because tomorrow it is anotherjob and this job goes by unity and because we have a genuine project. we can face our nation with genuine solutions and i believe that it will work. the point is that tonight, people say that with such a huge victory, what is left? a lot is left and a lot must begin again. i
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just tweeted that in fact we are going to have a new legislative parliamentary election and this is why i believe we can do it. nothing is lost yet. i should remind people that he took 33 of the departments, the voting districts, from francois hollande but he did not take the share of the vote apart from in one of them. he did not have the share that hollande had in 2012 but this is an extraordinary political rise. macron is a former investment banker, he served as an adviser and minister in the socialist government of francois hollande, the outgoing president but he resigned last year to form a centrist political movement called en marche. the choice of a country who is
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desperate for change, neither left nor right, part of the french establishment but never before elected. a fresh face who served in the outgoing government. so, who is emmanuel macron? to his supporters he is emanuel, their political messiah, a provincial boy from outside the establishment who worked his way to power. he is a new man to politics. he's trying to find new solution. he is a new face, he is our hope. he went to france's most prestigious schools, met its most powerful people and made millions in an investment bank. a former colleague says that macron's rise is partly down to charm but at heart, he isa partly down to charm but at heart, he is a secretive man. he is able to tell people what they really want to hear. so very seduces man and he
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manages to agree with nearly everyone. that is a talent. macron's wife, brigitte, told a journalist that her husband never let people close. the couple met when she taught him drama, their unusual love affair isa taught him drama, their unusual love affair is a sign, says one of macron's old friends, of his determination, self belief and drive. i think the only person who really knows him inside the plea is brigitte. —— deeply. you have to imaging, he seduced her, he convinced her to marry him, leaving herfamily. just convinced her to marry him, leaving her family. just imagine, it convinced her to marry him, leaving herfamily. just imagine, it is not a small thing. france has not opted for the political extremes, the far
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right rejected in favour of a liberal newcomer with his own promise of change. emmanuel macron has promised to unite a divided france but his critics say he is the old wine in a shiny new bottle and the price of failure could be high. some say that emmanuel macron has won the presidency by being all things to all people but he won't be able to govern that way. he has five yea rs able to govern that way. he has five years dissolved france's problems or risk choosing more radical change next time. lucy williamson, bbc news, paris. old wine in a new bottle, we will get opinions on that in a moment. let's look at the coming weeks and months. sometime between tuesday and saturday the 13th, the government of the sitting president francois hollande will resign. by monday the 15th, and it must be by then because five years will be up, macron will be sworn in as president of france
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at the elysee palace, a grand affair. at the moment there is no precise date for that. it won't be clear until next month how easy or how hard it will be for mr macron to push through his agenda because as we've been discussing, in earlyjune the 1st round of elections to the lower house of the french parliament ta kes pla ce lower house of the french parliament takes place and a week later it is the second and final round. a government reshuffle is likely and believe me, it gets tactical, doesn't it, when we get to the second round of the french election. it doesn't follow that he's going to get a parliamentary majority. we try not to give him this majority because i think this will be very disastrous in a way that it will be an adventure. when you look at the economic project of macron, sometimes he is right, sometimes he is left, how is he going to have
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compliance between those positions? i don't know. we need a strong republican opposition so that we bring some reason back. this is what we are going to stand for. it means we are going to stand for. it means we have not won and we have not lost yet. quite a fierce battle for the legislative and national assembly. i do believe we can make it because i've been astonished by people saying that they voted for macron but in the legislative they will vote for me. i am very present in my constituency, i go everywhere so that i can explain why i voted blank andi that i can explain why i voted blank and i did not vote for macron. i'm not schizophrenic, you know. how can you vote for a man who you are going
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to oppose in a fortnight in east assiduously? i could not really stand on that —— in each stitch and see. i voted stand on that —— in each stitch and see. ivoted blank stand on that —— in each stitch and see. i voted blank which is why i'm standing now and very firmly against his policies. millions of people voted blank today and the turnout was lower than it was in the first round. quite a few digits lower than the first round of the 2012 presidential election. i'm joined by a cyber security experts. i'm glad you're here because we've been skirting around the elephant in the room, this huge dump of e—mails and m essa g es we room, this huge dump of e—mails and messages we got on friday evening just ahead of the vote, a hack of mr macron's servers and computers, circulated widely on the web. what do you know about who was involved and where it came from? it is always very difficult if not impossible to
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do any attribution when it comes to cyber war. this is obviously an act of cyber war. what we know so far is that some of them are fake and some have nothing to do with macron, they are from 2002 before macron did anything with politics. and the rest of the files, so far, nothing has come out... you say that some of this was taken from the servers, but as mr macron said on friday, it was released one hour before the purdah, so it was pretty cynical, released when he wouldn't be able to react. you say that some of the documents mixed in work. a fake? definitely, there is proof of that, meta data inside the excel files, they were tampered with. so you think it has
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come from the russian group, the fa ncy come from the russian group, the fancy bears group involved in the clinton hack? no, they are high end professionals who wouldn't make such an obvious mistake. this is amateurish or an obvious false flag. we don't know, but it isn't the work ofa high we don't know, but it isn't the work of a high end professional making his own fortified files. this is a very tricky matter and i condemn such tricks —— making his own falsified files. i condemn these kind of things because it isn't acceptable. it is the new reality, isn't it? it happened to hillary clinton's campaign, the server in podesta was hacked and e—mails circulated. is this the new normal? we must condemn and defend ourselves against such methods because i think
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it is hurting our democracies and i think it is very dangerous for eve ryo ne think it is very dangerous for everyone and that's why i would say on this point that i support macron. it wasn't just the e—mails that were released, it was these fake documents circulated earlier in the week about his fake account in the bahamas, a different story. we can relate this to propaganda, there is a serial number in the file. it is very amateur work. it is coming from an old right group in america. —— alt right group. they were very amateur and this had nothing to do with what clinton faced, which was extremely sophisticated and powered by incredible technologies. the same with brexit, there is a nice piece this morning about democracy being
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hijacked explaining the technological aspect. what we are seeing in france is going low—tech in comparison. the hack, the release was not sophisticated but what happened when the information was out, these bots worsening at around the world very quickly. far quicker than you could lose it —— far quicker than you could do it. —— worked sending it around the world. it was illegal to publish the details in france. french phrase book was censored and —— the french facebook was censored, most modern states have the tools to do information warfare. the other phenomenon is that there is what they call suppression, targeting opposition voters, targeting
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melenchon voters, suppressing the vote of other candidates. it did not influence the vote of the french because everybody knew that something was against macron. trying to be very aggressive against a candidate, and by publishing fake news like that, people are not that silly. it did not influence the french vote this time perhaps but what about the applications for the german election around the corner and other elections? it depends, either they will face the same things that the english —based during brexit and the
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us faced when trump was elected, a really high end technology propaganda machine or the same thing we faced in france which is basic, amateurish leaking and that will not have a real impact unless it reveals something. in france, you must see that the leaks did not receive any —— did not reveal anything about macron. do the media report what is out there because it has been put out there because it has been put out or do you take a stand and ignore it? i think it is more important to ignore this kind of thing. that won't happen in reality. in france, it is the law, you are not allowed to say anything in this specific period. tomorrow, if there is another league, the media will jump is another league, the media will jump on it —— if there is another
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leak. doesn't the louvre look resplendent? you will recognise the pyramid and the stage to the right is where we expect emmanuel macron to appear in front of thousands of supporters and we will bring you that as soon as it happens. you are watching bbc news. here is a round—up of the other stories. labour says it will not raise income tax for anyone earning less than £80,000 a year as part of an election pledge to low and middle earners. the shadow chancellor, john mcdonnell, said those earning over the £80,000 threshold would be asked to pay "a bit more" to help pay for public services. the conservatives say they have no plan to raise income tax but have so far refused to completely rule it out.
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our political correspondent ben wright reports. it was a slogan used by tony blair, now revived by labour's new leadership. setting out what he called a big deal to upgrade the economy, john mcdonnell promised not to raise vat or national insurance for anyone, but said the top 5% of earners would pay more. if labour is elected next month, we will guarantee for the next five years, there will be no income tax rises, for all those earning less than £80,000 a year. labour is now the party of low taxes for middle and lower earners. mr mcdonnell said people earning more than £80,000 a year would pay a modest amount more but the rates and details would have to wait for the manifesto. the conservatives have promised not to raise vat but have so far made no matching pledge on national insurance or income tax. today, the tories said labour was going back to the past. this is a clear statement of intent. they want to raise taxes, they want to penalise business,
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they want to penalise wealth creation and i think they will end up wrecking the economy as they have done in the past. the total amount of income tax raised in 2016 is just over £169 billion. the top 5% of uk earners, labour's target group for tax rises, paid just over 47% of that, close to £80 billion. you cannot make a really big change to the amount of money that is available just by focusing on people over 80,000 a year, partly because they already pay an awful lot of tax and a lot more than they did a few years ago, but partly because if you really want significant amounts of money, you have to do something the politicians don't like doing, which is hit the majority of people, which is where vat and the national insurance and a lot of income tax is actually paid. you are pledging to increase tax on high earners have to pay for public services and borrow billions for infrastructure, but that has been labour's message sincejeremy corbyn became leader. why do you think it can turn things
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around for labour in the last four weeks of this general election campaign when it seems it has not worked so far? i think there is an opportunity now in the general election campaign which we have not had before since jeremy corbyn was elected leader. i think we can turn the polls around and i genuinely think we can secure a majority onjune 8th. many of the bankers and financiers who work here would pay more income tax under labour's plan and this is the first general election for many years, when there is a stark choice developing between labour and the conservatives with how the economy should be run and how money should be raised and spent. the liberal democrats say their manifesto will include a commitment to keep the "triple lock" on pensions. this would guarantee they rise by as much as wages, inflation or 2.5%, whichever is highest. but pensioners with annual incomes above £45,000 would lose the winter fuel payment.
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labour has also pledged to retain the triple lock; theresa may has declined to say whether the conservatives would do so. more than 80 nigerian schoolgirls kidnapped by the militant group boko haram have met the country's president after being freed in a prisoner swap. the girls from chibok were among more than 200 who were taken three years ago. the government says they'll be given medical checks before being reunited with theirfamilies. around 100 others are still being held. that s all from me for now — let's return to paris and rejoin christian fraser. hello and welcome to a bbc news french election special. we are focusing on the presidential elections. i am christian praise in paris. the news is that the french have chosen emmanuel macron to
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become the next president. at 39 the centrist party leader will be the youngest leader of france since 1848. he has beaten the far right candidate marine le pen and has taken more than 65% of the vote. according to the latest projected results. these are life pictures of the louvre or, where thousands of people have gathered and isn't it looking resplendent in the spotlight. we expect him to be on stage in the next ten or 15 minutes. gilles hasjoined me on the balcony, the author of terror in france i am pleased to say that the election has passed off well apart from some incidents. unfortunately one policeman was killed on the champs—elysees just before the first
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round but nevertheless in the last six months we had no successful attack because it was nipped in the bud by the french police establishment which finally broke the codes to a large extent of this third—generationjihad in the codes to a large extent of this third—generation jihad in europe. the codes to a large extent of this third—generationjihad in europe. we had over 230 people who died between the charlie hebdo attack injanuary 2015 and this poor catholic priest who was stabbed to death injuly 2016 in normandy. had that gone on, then the elections would have been then the elections would have been the hostage of... so in that sense the hostage of... so in that sense the police have done a good job? definitely. we have many other things to fix, the judiciary, the prisons on the big incubatorfor jihadism, because when they are in jail they close to lies and they make more delinquents. everywhere in italy the french case is apparent
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time. why is that wit that we have so many attacks and how did we manage to deal with it to some extent. but also lessons for britain because one of the bloodiest attacks recently was the attack on houses of parliament in westminster. although there is always a debate about whether somebody like that is what you would call a jihadist all psycho. someone with anger issues. it isa psycho. someone with anger issues. it is a blend of both, definitely. but this is part and parcel of the vocabulary ofjihad. and you could have another attack for another reason. this takes place within that frame of mind and you have to understand how it functions, you have to read the text, the doctrine of thejihadism, you have have to read the text, the doctrine of the jihadism, you have to try to put that together and this is one of the big challenges for europe in general. you've done plenty in
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europe advising the last few governments on the jihadists threat. they never really listened! not much. what do you make of this man we are about to see on stage, marine le pen says he is weak on terror and wea k le pen says he is weak on terror and weak on security. not really. she knew very well that the more attacks that would have happened, the more votes you would have had. she had nothing to do but shut her mouth after that because she was very much aware of that. she didn't have much to do except to say that she would expel everybody from france. emmanuel macron walking out to the theme tune of the european union, interestingly. coming down the steps of the louvre, looking a bit presidential and slightly sombre, on
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his own, which is interesting, not with brigitte alongside him. it is worth reminding you just how far he has come in such a short space of time. just 39, he was of course educated at one of the ivy league universities in paris and then he went to the prestigious ena which is the classic training ground for the political elite in france. then he went to rothschild and worked as an investment banker. he was quite influential in the nestle—pfizer deal, you made quite a bit of money out of that and came to the attention of francois hollande. for some years he was then an economic adviser to the new president and then of course became economy minister. tried his best in the two yea rs minister. tried his best in the two years that he was in that office to put through some liberalising policies of the french economy that was really defeated by the left of
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his party and also by the people on the street, the macron law as it became called was watered down quite significantly. and perhaps it was the frustration of that that led him to break from the socialist party, taking a gamble at such a young age to become a centrist leader of, it isn't even a party, it's a movement, en marche. and in the next few weeks he's got to create a party out of the many supporters that you will see here tonight. up and down the country knew people will be coming into politics, he's got to find a majority of 289 out of 577 deputies and there are plenty of people who think that will be quite a tough ask. particularly since, as such a new party, he doesn't really have the finance to take on the bigger parties, the socialists and the republicans who were defeated in the first round. gilles, you have long
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watched things like this, what do you make of the long walk from the louvre to the stage? nobody would have bet a nickel on him one year ago, and! have bet a nickel on him one year ago, and i remember many people in the french establishment saying, emmanuel macron has the brains but he should try his luck in 2022 or 2027, rather than this election. and here he is and the victory was, many people say this is for the french but he got close to 66% of the votes which is quite an achievement. interesting, such a freshfaced young man, it is interesting that before he came here he made this rather sober speech at his headquarters, making sure that he spoke to eve ryo ne making sure that he spoke to everyone in france because this has been a divisive debate. absolutely.
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and the big challenge for him now is that he has the majority, to implement his policy of the parliamentary elections, which will ta ke parliamentary elections, which will take place in june. parliamentary elections, which will take place injune. and this is going to be a real problem because he has the right wing is broken, there is no socialist party animal. so he has still —— no party any more. so he has two bills of this majority, and definitely he's very young. he's the youngest chief of state we've had since napoleon bonaparte which may not be good news for the brits! you becoming after as! —— he will be coming after us! talking seriously about it, you had the brexit vote. the yankees had the trump phot. .. the brexit vote. the yankees had the trump phot... i mustjust the brexit vote. the yankees had the trump phot. .. i mustjust interrupt you for a second because he's going to speak. we'll come back to that
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napoleon bonaparte thought! chanting translation: thank you, my friends! thank you, to you, for being here this evening. you are tens of thousands and i can only see a few faces. thank you. thank you for being here. thank you for having fought with courage but kindness for so many months, because it's true, tonight, you won. franz won. what we have done for so many months
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there's no comparison, there's no equivalent to that. everyone was saying to us, it is impossible. but they didn't know anything about franz! —— about france. thank you for your commitment, thank you to all of you. thank you for the risks that some of you have taken. i know about it. and your trust, something that creates an obligation for me, and something that i feel you have interested in me and! that i feel you have interested in me and i don't want to disappoint you. i want to be worthy of your
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trust. and for the five years to come i want to carry the elan and the dynamism that you present. and tonight i would also like to say something for the french people who voted for me without necessarily sharing my ideas. you committed yourself, and i know that it is not that obvious, and i would like to say something for people who voted merely because they wanted to protect and defend the republic. in the face of extremism. i know that there are disagreements and i will respect this. and i will be faithful
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to that commitment taken. i will protect the republic. and i would also like to say something to voted for marine le pen. you mustn't shout because they did express today the rage, the loss and the convictions in some cases and i do respect that. and i will do my utmost for the five yea rs and i will do my utmost for the five years to come to make sure that they don't have any reason to vote for an extremism position ever again. tonight there's only all the people of france, gathered together, and
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what you represent tonight here in the louvre, i mean it's a fervour, and enthusiasm, it is the energy of the population and the people of france. and this place where we find ourselves together tonight, that's what it expresses. it is the expression of our history, until the time of the liberation of paris, the french revolution and it is the example of that pyramid, the location, the place, where all the people of france this place, the embodiment of france, the fans that everybody is looking at because today it's europe, it's the whole world looking at us. europe and the
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world. expecting for us to defend everywhere the enlightenment which has been threatened in so many places. they expect us to defend everywhere freedoms to protect people who are oppressed, they expect from us to bring forth a new hope, a new form of humanism. a safer world. a world of freedom that was fought for, a world of growth, a world where there is more justice. we ecology is respected. they expect from us to be at long last what we are ourselves. the task awaiting us my fellow citizens is an enormous
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task. and it is a task that is going to start tomorrow. which will impose on us to moralise public life. to defend our democratic vitality. to reinforce our economy and to build up reinforce our economy and to build up the new protections that are necessary for the world around us and to give to all and sundry the place through work, to study, through culture, to refund our europe and to guarantee the security of all the people of france. the task that awaits us. it is a colossal task. yes of course tonight we wa nt colossal task. yes of course tonight we want a right that entails obligations, that audacity will carry on and every day it will carry
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an because that is expected by all the people of europe and the world and that is what is expected from us. they expect that once again, france is a country of surprise, a country that is faithful to itself and that is what we will do. our task is enormous, my friends. and it is going to require the commitment of all of us. the commitment of our armed forces and police, all the public services, your commitment, the commitment of all of you, people who have been elected, who are the head of charities, at the head of trade unions, who are civil servants, who are tradesmen, farmers, bosses, students, pensioners... our task is enormous.
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and the task will require that we are truthful, that we need to have the courage of truth. the courage we put forward throughout the campaign, and will carry on putting it forward , and will carry on putting it forward, i will carry on putting it forward, i will carry on putting it forward for you. our task is enormous and it will impose that which we built from tomorrow onwards, real majority, strong majority. a majority centred on change. that is what the country is dreaming ofand change. that is what the country is dreaming of and that is what the country deserves. a majority centred on change, that is exactly what i'm expecting from you in the weeks to come because once again, and many times, i will need you. my fellow
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citizens. all of you, men, women, present here by my side, for so many days and so many nights, the people of france gathered here today in the louvre, we have the strength, we have the energy, we have the will, the will that has carried us forward , the will that has carried us forward, that has made us what we are and that is what will lead our future. we will not be the victims of fear. we will not back down in the face of division or lies. we will not cede any ground to sarcasm, irony, to the fascination for defeat
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or decline. i know that fervour that you carry within you, and i know what i owe you, and i know tonight what i owe you, and i know tonight what i owe to the people that supported me, my friends, my family, and the people close to me. it is not going to be easy everyday, i know that. the task is going to be arduous. but every time, every time i will tell you the truth. but your fervour, your energy, your courage a lwa ys fervour, your energy, your courage always is something that is going to carry me forth. i will protect you
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in the face of threats, and i will fight for you on your behalf against inefficiency, against lies, to improve the life of all of us. and i will respect each one of you, in what they think, in what they believe, in what they want to defend. and i will gather together andi defend. and i will gather together and i will reconcile because i want the unity of our people and our country, and finally, my friends, i will be at your service. with modesty, humility, with strength, i will be at your service on behalf of our motto, liberty, equality, fraternity. i will be in your
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service and at your service. being faithful to the trust that you have put in me and i will be at your service with love for you all. long live the republic and long live france! cheering studio: there is emmanuel macron, president elect of france aged 39, an extraordinary achievement. alongside his wife brigitte, taking
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the adoration of the thousands who are tonight in the louvre were, in front of the pyramid. very sober and serious speech. he mentioned, you will have noticed, on several occasions, the enormous task that he is facing in the five years ahead, plenty of people in france will agree with that. the country says he is dreaming of change, crucially, he is dreaming of change, crucially, he is trying to unite the country, he says he respects the rage and anger of the le pen camp. lots of young people are coming onto the stage with him. this really is a young movement. for months, there have been young people in sweatshirts standing and sitting in macron offices around the country, pulling in payments from people, small payments, in fact they hired a company that had worked for president obama in the united states to help them get the party of the ground. and it is those small contributions that have really brought them to this point.
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contributions from all around the country. now they are playing the french national anthem, la marseillaise. and you probably saw the president elect closing his eyes and putting his hand to his chest. he can probably hardly believe what has happened to him in the last year, from political obscurity, really, to the highestjob from political obscurity, really, to the highest job in from political obscurity, really, to the highestjob in the land, gilles. he is the gilles of french politics. what we saw in america and in britain was that the election was the opposite movement to one, the brexit movement who won in britain, and a strongly european candidate
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who won in france. the european movement may be dysfunctional, yet the french believe that their future lies within the european union and there is no alternative. so this is something that means blood and tears probably and a lot of difficulties in the future but nevertheless it is their choice. you saw him kissing a little girl, he doesn't have any children of his own love his wife has three from her former marriage and he has seven grandchildren that he says his family. one of his wife's daughters has worked with him on the campaign so there's obviously a close bond between her children and the president elect. it looks like it and this is part of the interest in macron because he is anti—climactic in the way he's let his life. his wife is not the traditional housewife, to say the least, and she forms striking contrast with your former
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compatriot, penelope fillon. penelope stayed at home waiting for her husband in greek mythology. brigitte writes his speeches and is very much involved in the background. she is an inspiring figure to a number of women who can identify with her because she is pa rt identify with her because she is part and parcel of the political environment, his political environment, his political environment and i believe this is extremely important. this is creating a totally new figure for french politics. now, will he managed to win his bed and when the parliamentary election? we will see. this is the big question —— when his bet. thank you both very much, stay with us, more to come. hello, there. plenty of different
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features that can affect our weather, cloud amends, rainfall, sun chang, wind direction, and during the week ahead, they will jostle for position to determine just how the weather looks and feels, and the start of the week is going to feel cool because it is this north, north—easterly wind that dominates, bringing in quite a lot of cloud across eastern areas, perhaps the occasional spot of drizzle, the best of the sunshine on monday should be at west whereas the east will feel decidedly chilly, eight or 9
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degrees, and even when we get that sunshine that the west temperatures will be lower than they have been. through monday the wind will become less of a feature because the white lines on the chart become more widely spaced. they open up so those winds are lighter. there will be a fairamount of winds are lighter. there will be a fair amount of cloud by this stage on tuesday morning suit tuesday will bea on tuesday morning suit tuesday will be a cloudy day, that code could even be thick enough to produce the odd spot of drizzle but w e will see some sunny breaks here and there, temperatures between ten and 16 degrees. through tuesday night into wednesday high—pressure is the main player in and as the the british isles the wins will be fairly right and we should lose most of that cool breeze. many places will feel warmer, more warm sunshine, the best across england wales and northern ireland, with some patchy cloud during the day. across scotland more clout and perhaps patchy rain towards the far north—east. wednesday evening, things could get on top of the british isles the wins will be fairly right and we should lose most of that cool breeze. many places will feel warmer, more warm sunshine, the best across england wales and northern ireland, with some patchy cloud during the day. across scotland more clout and perhaps patchy rain towards the far north—east. wednesday evening, things could those winds will start to strengthen, becoming more of a feature in the south as the isa bars perhaps a more significant feature will be showers which should move
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erratically into southern areas, further north more sun chang, temperatures not doing badly, 11—19 perhaps more significant feature will be showers which should move erratically into southern areas, further north more sunshine, temperatures not doing badly, 11— through thursday night this low that will become the main feature, driving while our weather, bringing lumps of driving while our weather, bringing lu m ps of wet driving while our weather, bringing lumps of wet weather up from the south and with that i think it's this low that will become the main feature, driving while our weather, bringing lumps of wet weather up from the south and with it could be heavy because the warm airsome fairly warm airas heavy because the warm airsome fairly warm air as well. that means that when we see some rain, and we will see some by the end of the week, it could be heavy because the warm rain will be welcomed, a bit of uncertainty about how far north it will get across parts of scotland. by will get across parts of scotland. by the end of the weeklies are the different features that may have a pa rt different features that may have a part to play. low—pressure to the west, another low in the atlantic, another area of high pressure, the jet stream will decide which of those different features will become the main feature to take us through next week and beyond. it looks as if the jet stream will break through running from west to east, widening weather systems in the atlantic and driving them towards the north—west of the british isles. at the same
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time high—pressure has its part to play working its way towards the south—east. beyond into the following eight there will be high—pressure close by to the south and east, with areas of low pressure likely to run across northern and western parts of the country, with that south—westerly wind, as we move further ahead, the wettest weather will be in the north—west and with that south—westerly wind it will generally feel fairly warm. tonight at ten — the people of france have chosen their new president, the youngest in the country's history. the youngest in the celebrations in paris tonight, as emmanuel macron, a strong supporter of the european union, wins power at the age of 39, it will be his first experience of elected office. translation: with total devotion, with total determination,
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i'm going to serve our country. with total determination, i'm going to serve france on your behalf. long live the republic and long live france. it's a night of defeat for the hard right campaign of marine le pen, but she insists her agenda is now in the mainstream of political debate. in the mainstream translation: i will be at the head of a battle to gather together,
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